A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Game of Thrones Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

A Game of Thrones (1996) | Written by: George R. R. Martin | Published by: Bantam Spectra

A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin
Thug Notes Summary & Analysis

Wut it do son? This week we gettin’ ROYALLY fu**ed with Book 1 of A Song of Ice and Fire: A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

Man this is gonna be a bitch. OKAY, so dis book split up in to a buncha different narratives: Each chapter is told from da perpective of one of da main characters, like Ned, Daenarys, Jon, Arya… I could go ON playa. But I’m a break down this bad boy by gettin’ all geographical on yo asses. One plot takin place on West Side, one on the East Side, and da other up at a big-ass ice Wall up in da North. We’ll get to dat later, but fo’ now let’s see what’s goin down ova’ here.
Illustration: Show the map of GOT world. As Sparky says each one, there should be a collection of faces next to the respective location.

Ned Stark is da top dog of a hood called Winterfell, da swoelest kingdom in the North. Afta’ takin care of some brutha who couldn’t keep his word, Ned start truckin it back to Winterfell, but befo’ he get there, he say “sh** man, I’m gonna rep dem Stark Colors and adopt some of deez direwolves right hurr.” So he get a direwolf for erry child he got- His three legit sons Rob, Bran, and Rickon, his two daughters Arya and Sansa, and his bastard love-child Jon Snow.

So Ol Ned ready to chillax back at his crib when da King Robert Boratheon swang in to town and Ned be like “Oh sh** brutha what you doin in my hood?” da King like “Son. You heard da news? My right hand man Jon Aryn just got merced and ain’t nobody know why.” Ned like “no sh**?” “Word. You gonna get my back and be my new advisor?” “Man dat ain’t really my style.” But when Ned’s woman Catelyn get word from her sister Lysa dat it was Robert’s Queen and her fam, the Lannisters, dat were behind the hit, Ned, like “fu** it, let’s do this, king.”

Now the Lannisters be anotha’ one of da Great Crews of the Seven Kingdoms. King Robert is married to Cersi Lannister, and her twin bro Jaime Lannister, is s’posed to protect the king in case anyone try to step.

Later, Ned’s boy Brann just mindin’ his own bidness when UGHHH! shawty walk in on Cersi gettin’ summodat bro-sauce from Jaime! Dat ain’t right. They gotta make sho Bran don’t snitch, so they toss his ass out a window. He ain’t dead, but dog is fu**ED up and don’t remember nuthin.

So Ned head to King’s Landing with his two girls Sansa and Arya. Joffrey, the 12 year old son of da king, and Sansa’s future man, is always talkin smack and tryna start sh**. When he fu** wit’ lil Arya though, shawty show him what’s up: Arya’s direwolf gets all up on dat hater, and Arya not only swipes his blade, but throws it in the damn river. Joffrey whines like a lil’ bitch and SANSA’S direwolf gets wrecked by the Queen, since Arya’s already skipped town. Things between the Starks and the Lannisters ain’t lookin’ so good.

Back in Winterfell, some hood-ass brutha try to ice lil’ Bran while he snoozin, so Catelyn head to Kings Landing to tell Ned what went down. Ned hook up wit Varys, the master of secrets, and da king’s shysti-ass advisor Pyotr Baelish, who like “Hey Pssst. Dat knife belong to Tyrion Lannister, the lil’ dwarf brutha to Cersi and Jaime.” So Catelyn hits up her sister Lysa and puts Tyrion on lockdown in her crib. Tyrion ain’t there long, tho. Brutha shakes dem haters off after some gangsta named Bronn wins his freedom by WRECKIN’ some fool.

Eventually Ned figger out da secret dat put Jon Arryn in the dirt: Joffrey ain’t even the king’s legit son. He da inbred love child of Cersi and Jaime Lannister. Ugh. Dat mean he ain’t got no right to da crown. When Cersi realize what Ned know, she like “Damn. I gotta get dat crown on Joffrey’s head befo’ da word gets out.” So girl plots on her hubby and King Robert gets ganked in a hunting “accident.” Now that he dead, Ned grabs Pyotr Baelish and say “Dog, I need some thugs to get my back while I challenge Joffrey’s claim to the throne.” Baelish like “Sho’ thang, Blood. I got you.” But Baelish betrays him, Joffrey becomes king, and slices Ned’s damn head off! ICE COLD.

When Ned’s oldest boy Robb hear his daddy been dun ditry, he start building a phat crew of Northeners. Afta’ makin the Lannister army his bitch, errybody start callin him “The King in the North.” Swag.

Aight, so this is what we got goin on in this big ice cube up in the North called “The Wall,” which keep out deez “savage” humans called Wildlings, and whateva’ da hell OTHER sh** out there from messin’ wit da 7 Kingdoms. Ned’s bastard, Jon Snow, grindin’ as a man of the Nights Watch, which basically a crew of virgins who devote their lives to guarding the wall.

Jon always lookin’ out for this fat-ass bruh named Samwell. He a nice dude n’ all, but dog can’t do sh** with a sword. Later, Jon find out dat some of his Night’s Watch homies got smoked in combat and now they been goin all Thriller up in here- They straight up become crazy undead hustlas called Others. sh**. So when deez haters try to throw down, Jon saves da Lord Commander from gettin’ wrecked.

When Jon get word dat his daddy been merced, he try to join his bro Robb in the good fight, but afta’ some Night Watch Big dawgs tell him he best pick duty over love, he jus’ like “meh. fu** it.”. So Jon packs up dem nuts and stays a man of the Night’s Watch.

On da East Side two siblings named Viserys and Danaerys Targaryen tryna crew up wit some soldiers. See, their daddy was rockin da crown befo’ Robert Boratheon, so dem two kids thinkin dat throne is THEIRS. So Viserys allies wit this badass mutha named Khal Drago by slangin Danaerys’s ass at him. As a wedding present, Daenaerys get three petrified dragon eggs- primo sh** since nobody dun peeped a dragon in ages.

Viserys always talkin mad sh** to Daenarys and slappin her up like he own her o’ somethin. But when he finally threatens Daenarys AND her baby she got comin’, Khal jus’ ICES dat hater. Later, Drogo gets shanked in battle, and some healer SAY she gonna help him. But girl just make it worse and Drago get so dead in tha head, that Danaerys just end it fo’ him. All to’ up, Danerys starts to burn her hubby’s body with dem three dragon eggs. Then she decide “fu** it. I’m gonna walk my ass over in to dat fire. Cuz why not?” When dat fire done blazin’ all dat’s left is Danaerys chillin w three baby dragons suckin at those titties. The end.

Aight let’s start wit da basic sh**: Like you prolly guessed from the series title: this book STRAPPED wit images of ice and fire. Now a lot of ’em are gonna jump right out at ya: fo’ example, Dat Stark Crew ALL iced out. Da Stark Motto is “Winter is Coming,” and Ned’s sword even called “Ice. Plus we got dem ice-cold Other-Burtha’s romain around. Buur! On da firey side, we got Danaerys chillin in flames and headin up a brand new posse of three FIRE-breathing dragons. But we also gettin some subtler shoutouts to ice and fire: when somebody from the Night’s Watch gets wasted by one of the Others:
The pale sword bit through the ringmail beneath his arm. The young lord cried out in pain. Blood welled between the rings. It steamed in the cold, and the droplets seemed red as fire where they touched the snow.” (10)

But don’t trip, homegirl, cuz dat ain’t all. We got some pretty tight symbols in da novel too. My personal fav is dem Direwolves- gotta rep House Stark, AMIRITE? When Ned and his churrin find da mama direwolf on page 18, mama Dub got a foot of shattered antler stuck all up in her throat. If you open yo eyes and peep da House Baratheon sigil, you’ll they got a stag front and center, whereas the Stark crew got a grey direwolf- so dat wolf dyin from an antler foreshadowin’ dat ol Ned Stark bout to get his sh** wrecked, and dat House Baratheon gonna have somethin to do wit it.

Dem Direwolves also tellin us a lil somethin’ somethin’ bout they owners. Brann say on page 21 dat Jon Snow’s wolf was da first to open its eyes, while the others still blind. Likewise, Jon Snow see a buncha sh** dat otha’ people don’t. Like snow-bro say:
“A bastard had to learn to notice things, to read the truth that people hid behind their eyes.” (53)

Plenty mo’ peepers where dat came from, son, cuz eyes and sight poppin’ up all over A Game of Thrones. Dat badass Syrio Forel say he da most throwed up warrior in town cuz of what he call “the seeing:”
“Opening your eyes is all that is needing. The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. Look with your eyes. Hear with your ears. Taste with your mouth. Smell with your nose. Feel with your skin. Then comes the thinking, afterward, and in that way knowing the truth.” (532)

When da sh** go down and you gotta go toe to toe wit some hater, a real gangsta don’t just keep his heart in check, but also his mind. You gotta chill out- observe errything round you- and then you can get a lil’ taste of truth. But if this book showin’ us one thing, it’s dat ain’t nobody got a lock on Truth- not even da realest thug of them all, Ned Stark.

Homeboy puts the truth aside twice fo’ the people he love, and pay fo’ it with his head. As da Lord Commander of The Nights Watch preachin: “The Things we love destroy us every time.”

In a world where errybody backstabbin errybody on the reg, how’s a brutha gonna feel like he got any control over his destiny, man? Well maybe da only power you can really count on is power over yo’self. Tyrion drop this same knowledge on Jon Snow:
“Let me give you some counsel, bastardÉNever forget what you are, for surely the world will not. Make it your strength. Then it can never be your weakness. Armor yourself in it, and it will never be used to hurt you.”
If they want to give you a name, take it, make it your own. Then they can’t hurt you with it anymore.” (185)

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