1984 (Ninteen Eighty-Four) by George Orwell

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. First published in 1949, George Orwell’s novel has been one of the most influential texts of the 20th Century.

1984 (1949) | Written by: George Orwell | Published by: Signet Classics

1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

What up homies? Welcome back to Thug Notes. This week we stickin it to the man with 1984(fo) by George Orwell. 1984(fo) focuses on Winston Smith,
a mid-level member of a totalitarian regime known as The Party. Now the leader of this gang goes by the name of Big Brotha and represents the po-po keepin tabs on all yo sh**.

One day my boy Winston gets fed up wit the system and starts spittin fire up in his journal. But dat fool gotta watch his self cuz talkin smack about Big Bro is enough to get a brotha thrown in the slammer. Later, some fly hunny named Julia straight up booty calls Winston by passing him a note that says “I Love You.” Haell yeah. And after a while, Winston be thinkin he got mad love for this fox.

One day at work, Winston peeps some cat by the name of O’Brien who seems like he wanna stick it to Big Brother too. So Winston brings his boo Julia to Obrien’s crib where O’Brien say that he part of a rebel group called “The Brotherhood.” Winston be like “sign me up, blood.”

One night, Winston be readin some book that O’brien gave him when BAM, the 5-O come bustin through his door and bag him and homegirl.
Turns out, dat fool Obrien was secretly part of Big Brother’s
Thought Police crew.

And let me tell you somethin, homeboy. These fools AIN’T PLAYIN.

In order to realign Winston with the party’s mentality, Obrien be torturing Winston until he admit to crimes he ain’t even done. Then Obrien be all like “Yo. We ain’t done up in here until everything be dead inside you. Then after you empty, we gonna fill yo ass up with Big Brotha-ly love.” Ain’t that some sh**? But Winston say “Naw shorty, I keeps it real.”

This be one of them instances where keepin it real goes wrong cuz dat boy Obrien slings Winston’s ass in the wackest torture chamber yo bitch ass ever heard of- Room 101. Up in here, they put you up against your worst fears until you crack. So Obrien puts a cage full of rats all up in Winston’s grill until he gives in and starts screamin “Do it to Julia! Not me!”

In the end, The Man takes all the ‘soul’straight outta Winston. He ain’t even got ass on his mind no more. He only love Big Brother. The government dun got our boy on a short leash. Damn.

Aight son, you don’t know nuthin about Big Brotha unless you schooled on their wackest method of control- Doublethink. Let me break it down. It’s called doublethink cuz yo ass be thinkin in two ways at once.

The first is you making the conscious decision to believe something that be obvious bullsh**. The second is when you also deny that it’s even a lie in the first place. So in the end, youse a fool who be believin nonsense with all the conviction of it actually bein true. Like Obrien’s book say, doublethink goes on forever, with “the lie always one step ahead of the truth.” That sh** is ridiculous.

When most ballas think about Big Brotha, they usually think about the po-po peepin yo sh** with informants and telescreens. But what’s just as legit is the way The Party twists reality.

See, if you wanna roll like a G-ed up totalitarian dictator, you can’t just tear down the truth like Hitler, whose dumbass actually burned books that weren’t feeling his flow. Naw, you gotta build that sh** back up like Stalin, who actually rewrote those muthafu**as to be in line with his flava. Orwell’s Oceania be givin nods to Stalin, who was sho as hell better at controllin his peeps than Hitler.

Yo, you know what else is whack? As the party recreates reality, eventually all yo individual qualities get kicked straight to the curb. All yo memories, yo swag- EVERYTHING just be a product of what The Man be tellin you. How’s a brotha gonna know he exist if all he be is what the government tells him he be?

But let me be clear son. If you think this book just be a critique of Stalinism, you best check yo self blood. Cuz on the real, this book here is a warning for ALL mankind. Orwell sayin “Yo. unless we change sh** up in here, mankind gonna lose all their human qualities and we gonna become soulless robots and not even know it!” So we gotta rise up, stay righteous and protect our ideals about humanity,

Thanks for tuning in. Hit subscribe
and see yo ass next week.

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