Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) | Written by: Mark Twain| Published by: Barnes & Nobles Classiscs

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

What up yo? This week we flowin with our boy with Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry.

Huck Finn and his main man Tom Sawyer sittin FAT after their last adventure, but now Huck gotta live with some crusty ol widow who tryin to “civilize” him. When Huck’s boozed-up daddy Pap swangs in to town, he snatches up Huck to live in his stuffy-ass digs and try to swipe all his dough. Sick of gettin his ass whooped erry time Pap sips too much crunk juice, Huck decide to fake his own murder and lay low on Jackson’s Island while the laws patrollin.

After chillin a couple days on the island, Huck hooks up with Jim, a slave he know from the hood, who dun split after hearin his ass bout to get sold. Since they both duckin the 5-0, they decide to team up and skip town. When our boys get separated, Huck finds himself at the phat crib of the Grangerfords, a family who been beefin wit another crew called the Shepherdsons fo generations. Deez fools can’t even remember why they’re bustin caps in eachother. Huck straight flips when his boy Buck Grangerford get iced over some bullsh**. Then Huck and Jim rescue two shady thugs named the Duke and King as they runnin from the fuzz.

These fools sliding from town to town straight hustlin homies fo their paper. Eventually, these shysters get REAL dirty and sell Jim to a bunch of plantation owning crackas named The Phelps. Huck slides over to da Phelps spot to free Jim when a woman say “Yo wassap Tom!?” Tom? Turns out, these cats are Tom Sawyer’s aunt and uncle and they think Huck is Tom. When Tom actually shows up, Tom tells Huck to play it cool and Tom pretends to be his kid brutha Sid. Tom comes up with a plan to bust him out like it some kind of prison break. But just as they bout to split, Tom gets capped in the leg and Jim gets GOT again. Next morning, Tom all like: “Look, brah. Jim was actually a free man this whole time. So that escape plan? I was just playin.” The hell?! A brother’s freedom ain’t no game. So Huck and Jim part ways and Tom’s aunt offers to adopt Huck. but Huck done with all this “sivil” nonsense, so he decide to start trekkin to some new turf.

Open up yo ears and get ready for some truth, son! By far da most throwed-up symbol up in here is the Mississippi river. See, the river representin’ freedom- not only Jim’s freedom from slavery, but freedom from all the crooked sh** always goin down in the “civilized” world.

But at the same time, the river also reppin’ destiny. Cuz it’s the river doin all the shot calling: where they goin, when they gonna get there, and what kind of jacked up sh** they gonna find along the way. Now even though Huck thinks all dat mess is whack, it ain’t no thang to all dem “civilized” peeps Huck dealin with. And as the only brutha who keepin it real enough to see through society’s bullshit- he gets mad lonely.

When it was dark I set by my camp fire smoking, and feeling pretty satisfied; but by and by it got sort of lonesome, and so I went and set on the bank and listened to the currents washing along, and counted the stars and drift-logs and rafts that come down” (51)

Only when Huck gets to know Jim does he find someone he can chill with. And to Jim, ain’t nobody ever had his back like Huck. Dat raft becomes the realest home Huck ever known. Cuz when he on the shore, Huck
seein stupid shit go down on the reg- hoods talkin bout glockin eachother, families icing kids for no good reason, and his own daddy slappin him up. On the real, people people can be dicks, man. And what’s mad ironic is dat even though Huck ain’t educated, don’t buy in to no religious jive, and don’t consider himself to be “civilized,” he the only cat who wise to all the backwards-ass nonsense of a culture that accepts all this- and worst of all: slavery.

So when Tom’s aunt offers Huck a place to crash fo good, he says “naw shawty. I’m straight.” Huck don’t wanna be a part of the “civilized” world. He’d rather take his chances and slide to a new spot where he can create a better one.

And the first step to making it a better world is by hitting subscribe. Peace, my well-read ballas.

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