Animal Farm by George Orwell

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Animal Farm Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. This week’s episode is Animal Farm by George Orwell.

Animal Farm (1945) | Written by: George Orwell | Published by: Signet

Animal Farm
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

What it do comrade? This week on Thug Notes we going HAM with Animal Farm by George Orwell.

S’all gravy up at the Manor Farm ‘til one night a prize boar by the name of Old Major has a trippy-ass dream. So this porker hollers at his animal homies to preach some o dat raw gospel.

Major say that men are the only creature on the farm that consume errything, but don’t produce nothin. Which means the only thing standing between them animals and righteous livin is steppin to and stompin their two-legged oppressors. Rebellion, dog!

One night, the animals rise up and kick farmer Jones and his boys straight to the curb. Finally the boss of they own turf, the animals re-dub this bad boy “Animal Farm” and lay down a new rap called “Animalism. Up in this crib, the main verse is that all animals are equal.

After the dust settle, two pigs named Napoleon and Snowball start callin the shots. Thing is, they always gettin up in eachothers grill.

When some humans try to throw down and take back the farm, those animals don’t play- they straight beast these fools and send em packin.

Then Napoleon and Snowball start beefin bout the idea of building a windmill. When the other animals start siding with Snowball, Napoleon gets all crunk and chases him off the farm. Another pig named Squealer start tellin errybody that Snowball wasn’t nothin but a snitch and a traitor.

Now while all the other animals busting their ass building that windmill, the pigs realize that some of da swag they need, they just can’t get on their own. So they hit up their two legged enemies and startin tradin with them on the reg.

Over time, the seven Commandments of Animalism get twisted little by little, until one day, only one remains: “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

Eventually, the pigs get so crooked that they start struttin exactly like humans- walkin two-legged wit whips of oppression in hand.

And in the end, they ain’t nobody can tell the difference between pigs and humans. Looks like we back where we started.

Listen up, comrade. This book ain’t just a story bout animals.

On the real, Orwell droppin some mad allegory bout the rise and fall of da Soviet Union.

See, the pigs representin the top dawgs of the communist party. Napoleon stands for Stalin, the Soviet dictator, whereas Snowball really be Trotsky, the communist leader whose beef with Stalin got his ass slung out of Russia.

Squealer’s smooth talkin tendencies representin Pravda, a newspaper that spit lies to the people in order to further Stalin’s cause.

Old Major is a mix of Karl Marx, the OG commie theorist, and Vladimir Lenin, the brain behind the revolution. When Old Major preachin to the animals, his rhyme got the same flava as the end of The Communist Manifesto.

“The Communists ‘openly delcare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at the Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. WORKINGMEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!’”

Also, the animal’s revolt in chapter 2 echoin’ the Bolshevik Revolution of October 1917 against the czar, who be Mr. Jones in the story. And the humans’ attempt to retake the farm in chapter 4 reppin the civil war between the Russian loyalists and Bolsheviks in 1918.

Now of all things, why did Orwell use animals to chop game bout The
Soviet Union? Check this quote from Karl Marx’s Economic and Philosophical Manuscript of 1844:

“The worker in his human functions no longer feels himself to be anything but animal. What is animal becomes human and what is human becomes animal.”

But Animal Farm ain’t just goin off bout one point in history. This book offerin some legit truths bout all humanity. Cuz no matter who you wit, power can corrupt yo mind. And even the realest homies, like Boxer, are liable to start worshipping a crooked ass leader.

But you know what’s mad ironic, B? If you keepin it literal up in here, the revolution that went down at Manor farm was actually legit. By definition, a revolution ends where it began. Cuz the porky playas that started out gettin fu**ed by their human oppressors, are now the ones doin the fu**in.

Yo show your colors and get yoself a Thug Notes t-shirt, son! See you next week!

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