Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Frankenstein Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

Frankenstein (1818) | Written by: Mary Shelley | Published by: Simon & Schuster Books

Frankenstein
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

What’s good padna? This week we gettin monstorous with Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

When some playboy named Walton peeps some hood named Frankenstein in the North Pole, they begin conversatin and Franky starts spillin his life story.As a young’un, Victor Frankenstein only got two things on his mind: science, which he calls natural philosophy, and his cousin Elizabeth’s bangin boo-tay. Mmm!In college, Victor get so pro at the science game that he gets drunk off da power and decide it’s time to try and create new life.The result of Victor’s experiement is a busted-up monster so damn fugly that Victor wigs out and trucks it straight outta town.Later, the monster rolls up on Victor while he chillin and gives him the low down on what he been up to. See, after escapin from Victor’s stuffy ass crib, the monster posts up at some village where he start secretly creepin on one of da families.The monster learns all sorts of sh** from these homies- like how to read and communicate. But none of dat fixes the fact that he lonely as fu**.

So he decide he gonna try to chill with these ballas. But as soon as they catch a glance at his janky-ass mug, they all tweak out and get the hell outta dodge.Then the monster say Victor gotta build him a nappy woman-monster that he gonna take to the wilds of South America where they won’t bother nobody. At first my boy Victor think it’s a solid idea, but then he starts thinkin “Hold up! What if they start gettin freaky and make little monster babies?? AWW HELL NAW!” Animations: Victor starts ot build woman. Then he tears bride to pieces.Since Victor went back on his word, the monster gets all torn up and straight chokes a bitch- Victor’s bride Elizabeth. So Victor decide he gonna spend the rest of his days searchin the earth to stomp that scrub.But it’s a search Victor don’t get to finish, cuz he dies chasin his creation. When the monster finds him layin in chalk, he realizes that he lonelier than ever, and all that’s left for him is death.Say, dawg. Listen up and lemme school you on this book’s subtitle: “The Modern Prometheus.”- which servin up some real talk on the similarities between Victor and the Titan Prometheus. In Greek myth, mah homie Promy straight molded human beings out of some clay.

And in certain stories, Prometheus was jonesin to give man a lil taste of that heavenly fire. When he boosted it from the Gods, Zeus started trippin hard core. Just like that G-ed up Titan, Victor jacks a fire from the sky that not only bringin a plague down on himself, but errybody in the hood.

But why is everybody havin to ride this beef? Cuz Victor was chasing knowledge at the cost of errything else, just like Adam when he claimin his five-finger discount from the Tree of knowledge. And the biblical allusions don’t stop there, son. As the original gangsta of the human race, Adam wakes up in Eden, is given a bangin hunny by his creator, and is ultimately kicked out of paradise. But Frankenstein’s monster, as the first of his kind, wakes up in some broke-ass crib with body parts slung around, watches his woman get ripped apart by his creator, and ain’t never gonna find no paradise. Sucks to be this fool.

And it’s exactly all this bunk-ass jive that leads the monster to act like Milton’s Satan from Paradise Lost- one of the only books the monster’s ever read. Check it-

“I had cast off all feeling, subdued all anguish, to riot in the excess of my despair. Evil henceforth became my good.” (Shelley)

So farewell Hope, and with Hope farewell Fear,/ Farewell Remorse: all Good to me is lost;/ Evil be thou my good, (Milton)

But the monster ain’t the only one slangin dem dark deeds. Naw, son. Victor sippin the same kool-aid. Not only do they both waste eachothers biddy, but they handin out the same street justice: vengeance. And when its all said and done, Frankenstein and his monster ain’t so different.

All them blurry ethical lines point to the main thematic questions up in here: “Are we inherently good or evil?” Are people driven to murder cuz of society’s shit? Or is it written from day one that a playa gonna be a cold-hearted killa? And if so, who’s to blame? The monster or the creator?

Yo thanks for keepin it OG with yo boy Sparky. Subscribe and tune in text week.

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