Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Lolita Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

Lolita (1962) | Written by: Vladimir Nabokov| Published by: Olympia Press

Lolita
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

Sup playas? This week we mackin jailbait with Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov.

Humbert Humbert ain’t yo average horndog. This fool only got eyes for a special little girls age 9 to 14, or “nymphets” as he like to call em’. See, back when he was a young’un, Humbert had a lil sweet thang with a girl named Annabel. But since she up and died before he was able to get some, he spendin the rest of his days lookin for a girl who gonna remind of his first hunny love. Well lucky for Humbert, he rents a room in the house of Charlotte Haze, who got herself a 12 year old daughter named Dolores- but Humbert call this tease Lolita. And he gettn all riled up just thinkin bout this baby dip. Unfortunately Lolita ain’t the one tryna freak wit him. Charlotte’s old ass be all up on his nuts like nobody’s bidness. And when Humbert can’t duck her no mo, he decide to marry her so he can stay close to Lolita. S’all good til one day Charlotte goes sniffin around in Humbert’s diary. After learning that he can’t stand her stank ass but loves little Lolita, Charlotte gets all crunk and storms outta the house when BAM- girl gets TOOKEN OUT by a car. She dead.

So Humbert scoops up Lolita, brings her to a motel and finds out that this little girl knows more about freakin than he thought. So they hit the road swangin from spot to spot all round the country. All the while, Humbert think there be some scrub creepin on em. Eventually Humbert park it in some hood and sends lil Lolita to school. But when Lolita start talkin wit otha boys and actin all shady, Humbert won’t stop baggin on her. Outta nowhere, Lolita say they should peace outta town. On the road, Lolita gets ill and Humbert drops her at the hospital. But when he return, da nurse tell him “her uncle” already got her. Whaaat? She ain’t got no uncle! Humbert all torn up bout losing Lolita and spends YEARS lookin for her. One day, he gets a letter from Lolita saying that she married, knocked up, and need some cash. So Humbert drops everything and slides over to where she at. Lolita tells him that the fool who took her from the hospital was some playwright named Clare Quilty, and he was the one who creepin on them since back when. But that fool long gone now. Humbert begs her to drop her hubby and come back to him. But after she shuts his ass down, he throws her some dough, finds Quilty, and fills his bitch ass with some hot ones.

So Humbert gets thrown in a psych ward, and then the slammer, where he writes his memoir.

First thing you best recognize is that we dealin with the king of unreliable narrators up in this text. Not only is Humby all whacked out in the head, but that fool straight up lies to us.

Sparky reads quotes: “Being a murderer with a sensational but incomplete and unorthodox memory, I cannot tell you…” (217) “Emphatically, no killers are we. Poets never Kill.”(88)

Real talk or no, this thug’s memoir spillin clean over with literary references and fancy talk.

That’s part of what makes this book so damn cray. When homies peep game at Humbert’s fly-ass prose and dank jokes, they don’t find the monster they expectin. Instead, they find a funny, book-smart hood who got his own problems- and a bitch IS one. Eventually, the reader ends up sympathizing with this crazy mofo.

But that ain’t all Humbert doin by showcasin his verbal skillz. By spittin all dat fancy descriptive jive bout the world around him, Humbert messes with the readers head and makes them think bout regular erryday shit in a new way.

So when you reading this and start questioning “what’s normal?” Then Humbert dun got you by the balls sucka. Cuz when all dem pretty words pull you in to his reality, his whack-ass passions ain’t so whack no mo.

So not only does this book got a narrator who ain’t reliable, but this fool gone and even made the reader unreliable. Damn! Ain’t that some shit?!

Peep game at this mythological reference, home boy. In Greek Myth, Nymphs are often chased by hustlas who can’t keep it in their pants. Take Daphne and Apollo, for instance. When Daphne was duckin Apollo’s grubby paws, the only way she could escape is by transforming in to a Laurel Tree.

Turns out, it ain’t no different for nymphets neither. Lolita always tryin to dodge horny ol Humby but she only able to truly get away by transforming. By the end, Lolita ain’t Lo. Ain’t Lola. Ain’t Dolores. She now Dolly Schiller. And she’s finally free.

Thanks for ballin with me today.
Don’t forget to subscribe and, as always, keep it real. Peace.

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