Lord of the Flies by William Golding

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Lord of the Flies Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. First published in 1954, William Golding’s first novel sold fewer than 3,000 copies in the US before going out of print – and then resurging as a best seller.

Lord of the Flies (1954) | Written by: William Golding | Published by: Perigee Books

Lord of the Flies – Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

Yo yo this here is Sparky Sweets PhD and this week we gettin buck wild with Lord of the Flies by William Golding.

Dis book starts when a G5 full of prissy British boys crash lands on a remote island in da Pacific. Among the survivors be homies Ralph, Piggy, Jack, and Simon. In order to get their boys in line, Piggy and Ralph snag a big ass shell that they can use to holler at their boys and talk bidness. They call this “the conch.”

Now all these kids appoint my boy Ralph as the leader and he lets Jack be the head hunter. At first, Jack be too much of a bitch to kill for food, but soon enough dis gangsta busts his cherry and gets some o dat pork.
Now there’s facepaint on Jack. All the while, the youngins be actin scurred cuz some little fool say he saw a monster, but Ralph be all like “chill shawty, that sh**’s all in yo head”

Then one day Jack rolls up to camp, blows that conch, and say that he saw the beast with his own eyes and that Ralph ain’t got the balls to be the leader. Ralph say “Boy who you think you talking to?.” And Jack be like “look. If you all want some of dat bacon, you gonna have to leave Ralph’s posse and join my new crew. Straight up.”

So Jack and his crew shank another pig and impale its head on a stick as an offerin to the beast. Then, my brutha Simon has a vision of dat pork talkin to him! That pig head be referred to as “The lord of the Flies” and it start spittin cold truth up in Simon’s ear: He say that the beast ain’t somethin them boys can hunt cuz it ain’t nothin but the violence in dem kids hearts. Daym. Maybe Simon needs to stop chiefin that scroll.

When Simon hauls ass back to camp, all dem little homies mistake him for the beast and waste that fool in a cracked out frenzy. Even Ralph and Piggy get some licks in. Wheew, this sh** gettin real.

After that whack ass dance, Jack and his posse storm Ralph’s crib and steal Piggy’s glasses, which be the only thing they can use to make a fire.

Ralph just ain’t having it with this honkie Jack. So Ralphie boot up and starts brawlin wit this fool. During the tussle, Piggy gets thrown off a cliff and the conch shatters. Outnumbered by Jack’s homies, Ralph books it for the shore and just when he about to collapse, Ralph peeps a Naval officer chilling in the water. When this playa sees dem kids tryin to kill Ralph, he be like “Have you kids lost your damn mind?” Then he puts dem kids on the boat and takes em back to civilization. But they innocence is long gone.

Alright listen up play boy. dis book be an allegorical effort to take all the fu**ed up sh** about society and find its origin in human nature. By watchin these little white boys lose their mind, we reminded of humanity’s capacity for evil and how man-made moral systems be straight up superficial.

But you wanna know the wackest irony of all, my man? Even though adult life may look all righteous once dat navy playa drops in, the truth is, that soldier boy be smack in the middle of a war. In fact, this fool was trying to get the drop on his enemy when he found these kids. So the real tragedy up in here is that they ain’t nobody to save civilized humanity from they violent nature neither. You feel me?

You also best recognize that the central symbol up in this heezy is that pig-head on a stick, or what the narrator be callin “The Lord of the Flies”-another name for Beelzebub, the prince of demons. AKA THE DEVIL. And like the Devil be doin, he representing the destruction, decay and demoralization of man kind homie.

Yo, and if you wanna get all Freudian up in this bitch, you can say that The Lord of the Flies be representin “the id,” which functions only to ensure survival. Laws, moral codes, even intelligence itself don’t mean jack sh** when the id be in charge.

Look, You just ain’t rollin with the big dawgs unless you know bout this here motif.

All throughout this book dey be recurring patterns of fallin- Piggy fallin off the cliff and the conch falling with him, the falling parachutist, Ralph fallin at the navy man’s feet. All dat sh** be emphasizing the “fall of human kind” motif, my man.

Also, the Loss of Piggy’s sight be a symbol for the fall of reason. When that punk Jack boosts Piggy’s glasses to make a fire for his gang, it straight up indicates the transition from the reign of reason to the reign of savagery. Ya heard?

Yo. Thank for watchin Thug Notes.
Catch yall next week.

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