The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ The Cat in the Hat Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

The Cat in the Hat (1957) | Written by: Dr. Seuss | Published by: Random House

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss – Thug Notes Summary & Analysis

Sup y’all? This week we tearin sh** UP with The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss.

Mama’s dun peaced outta da crib and since it’s pourin ballz outside, Sally and her bro all alone wit nuthin to do. BOOOOORING.

Then- BUMP BUMP. “Man who da fu** is knockin on my d.. OH SH**!” The cat in the hat busts in.

Well I’ll be damned, it’s a cat
rockin a big-ass hat. Aight… Dat cat like “Listen up churrin, it’s time for a HOUSE PARTY!

Da cat keep goin HARD tearin sh** UP while dat fish jus’ won’t stop hatin’. Then, da cat whip out a giant red box with two hoods stuffed inside named Thing 1 and Thing 2. Deez blue-haired bruthas take it next level when they fly kites in da house and mess wit mama’s threadz when-

“Break yourselve’s fools! Mama comin’ home!”

“Don’t trip, fish-daddy” say the cat. “I got a swag ride dat pick up errything real quick like nuthin eva’ happened.” kling klang kling klang hell yeah.

When mama come home, errything all tidy like it was befo. She ask: “What y’all lil’ sh**s do today?” Hmmmmm. What would YOU say?

Now Dr. Seuss was bout as legit a doctor as Dre. Matta’ fact Seuss ain’t even his real name. It’s Theodore Giesel. And according to some of his homies, dis bruh wasn’t too different from da cat in the hat.

Jus’ like da cat who always tossin
sh** round, ragin hardcore, and makin a damn mess, Giesel was sick and tired of societies tryna keep everyone in line and actin’ like a bunch of tight-ass scrubs.

I mean da cat pretty much cruise up on dat spot wit one hand in the air and one hand on his nuts sayin “Rules are for bitches. Do yo own thang.” At the most subversive part of this thang is the ending:
“”Should we tell her about it? Now, what SHOULD we do?
Well… What would YOU do If your mother asked YOU?”

Look at this sh**… the narrator actin like there’s a difference between what he SHOULD do and what he GONNA do. You jus KNOW these kids bout to lie they asses off. Don’t even front, man. If you were a lil’ kid, you’d do the same thing.

Dat playa-hatin’ fish reppin da part of society dat always wanna keep you on the straight and narrow. Some even say he connected to Puritan morality. Others say that’s da whole reason he IS a fish- cuz he lookin’ like dat Christian symbol you see on da back of hoopties all da time.

And dat ain’t da only Christain symbol up in here, playboy. Afta da cat drop in at da crib, he start stackin’ some sh** and balancing it like a G- a fish, a cup, a book, I could go on playa. If you keepin it straight gangsta, you might see deez objects as religious symbols. Da fish = Christ, da cup = the holy Grail, and da book representin’ da bible. He keeps stackin and stackin but it eventually all hit the flo’. Maybe it symbolizin’ dat soceity gonna fall to sh** if we keep tryin to keep things too tied up. Or maybe it tryna tell us dat erry once in a while, we gotta forget da rules, get a lil’ crunk, and let dat beastly side RAGE. Cuz if we don’t, then sh** really gonna fall apart. Naw I’m sayin?

Yo I hope you learned something today, young bloods. I wanna know what you guys thought bout this episode. If you wanna see mo’ stuff like this, click on dat nasty-ass green eggs and ham. If not, click on Dostoevsky’s miserable mug.

Lemme know. We’re always listening to requests and tryna get to em all. So be sure to vote, thanks for watching, and I’ll see y’all next time. Peace.

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