The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ The Hunger Games Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

The Hunger Games (2008) | Written by: Suzanne Collins | Published by: Scholastic

The Hunger Games
Thug Notes Summary & Analysis

Say brah welcome to Thug Notes.
This week we payin tritube with The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins.

16 year old biddy Katniss Everdeen hustlin’ in a bent-ass vision of North America called Panem, which been split in to 12 districts all run by the Capitol. See, back in the day the districts tried to throw down with the The Big C, but they got WRECKED. Now the Capitol stages a televised Battle Royale called The Hunger Games to remind dem districts that they ain’t sh**. Erry year, 2 kids from each district get picked to run around a stadium glockin eachother til only one G remains. Crazy sh**, right?

So when time comes to pick da “tributes”, Katniss’s lil’ sister Prim gets picked to represent da big District 1-2, but Katniss say “Oh HAEEEL NAW. Best back off my blood. I’m goin!” The other tribute is some poor bastard named Peeta who Katniss know from da hood.

So Katniss and Peeta start gettin’schooled by their new teach Haymitch and roll up to the capitol to gear up for the games. Both of em recognize dat givin dem rich people a good show will give them a better chance of survivin’. So when Peeta say on air that he got the hots for Katniss, Katniss all like “Da Hell? You playin’ wit me boy?”

When the games start, Katniss hauls ass into da woods where homies droppin like flies. Eventually, Kat- neezy peep some badass mutha named Cato headin up a crew o hard-ass playas- AND DAT BOY PEETA DUN JOINED EM. DAMN! What dat fool thinkin’?

When dem leet killaz run Katiss up a tree, some lil G named Rue does her a solid and helps her get the jump on dem haterz. Then Katniss jacks a bow off one of em when “OH sh**, CATO RUNS UP ON OUR GIRL. But just then Peeta drops down and say “Bitch ruuuuun!” Wait which side he on?

Later, Rue and Katniss hatch a plan
to mess wit dat killa crew’s stash o goods, but Rue gets straight OJ- ed. Kat don’t play dat game and ICES Rue’s murderer. STREET JUSTICE.

Then da capitol lays down a new rule: two tributes can win as long as they from the same district. Oh snap! So Katniss finds Peeta whose leg all jacked up and then she say “Hold up. Lovers fighting for their lives is damn good television.” So she drags his ass to a cave, and starts nursin mo than just his leg, naw mean? And just like she thought, the capitol start makin it rain gifts.

Eventually dat fool Cato show his face and almost mercs Peeta, but with a lil teamwork, Katniss and Peeta throw his ass to the dogs.

Now that they the only ones still standin, they all like “We did it. Let us out yo!” Dem rich capitol folk decide to play dirty, though, and change the rules back to only ONE survivor. But Kat ad Peet call them out on their bullsh** and threaten to kill themselves by slammin some poison berries. Then they the Capitol ain’t got NO winners!

So then they like “aight aight chill baby You both win.” Even though they live to see another day, Peeta start actin like a whiny bitch when he realize Katniss was just gettin sweet on him to play the audience. And to top it all off, Katniss at the top of the Capitol’s sh**list for clownin’ em in front of the whole damn world.

Now no matter how hard you hustlin’, you ain’t stackin bread like ol Suzy-C. And I ain’t talkin bout her fat pockets, blood. Naw, this girl stackin a mad bread motif all up in this text.

Let’s take a look at dat fool Peeta. First off, look at his damn name. Next, brutha works at a bakery. And most importantly, he saved Katniss by givin her some bread when she was a lil girl. Like Katniss say:
“To this day, I can never shake the connection between this boy, Peeta Mellark, and the bread that gave me hope,”

And dat ain’t all son. The name of this backwards-ass country is Panem- which is Latin in Bread. Maybe Suzie givin a shoutout to my Roman homeboy Juvenal- “ the public has long since cast off its cares; the people that once bestowed commands, consulships, legions and all else, now meddles no more and longs eagerly for just two things – Bread and Games!” -Satire, X 77-81

And you best be peepin this motif too- flowers. Cuz in the face of all the ugliness of da Hunger Games, dem flowers constantly fillin our girl with hope. Not only is Katniss named after a plant that helps her stay alive, but Rue, the lil thug who helps a sista out, is also the name of a flower.
“Rue is a small yellow flower that grows in the Meadow. Rue.”

So when Rue gets shanked, somethin changes inside Katniss. Just survivin’ this mess ain’t enough no mo’. Now she gotta step up and try to smoke dem haters up in the capitol.

And that’s what I dig so much bout Katniss. In a time where money is power, she gonna stand up for the poor who can’t protect themselves and stick it to a culture as twisted as Rome before sh** fell apart.

Now while dis book got a whole lot in common with Ancient Rome- heres the crazy thing: it ain’t so different than ours.

“I program the closet for an outfit to my taste. The windows zoom in and out on parts of the city at my command. You need only whisper a type of food from a gigantic menu into a mouthpiece and it appears, hot and steamy, before you in less than a minute.”

And like Katniss sayin throughout the book: How you gonna worry bout yo threadz, bling, and entertainment when erryone else around you just grindin for bread? All kinds of fu**ed up.

So focus on the essential things in life: Like hitting dat subscribe button. Catch y’all later. Peace.

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