The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ The Scarlet Letter Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

The Scarlet Letter (1850) | Written by: Nathaniel Hawthorne | Published by: Ticknor and Fields

The Scarlet Letter
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

Whassup baby? This week on Thug Notes we gettin loose with The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Up in Salem Massachusets where errybody got REAL tight assholes, homies gather to peep the public humuliation of some thick hunny named Hester Prynne. See the One-time found Hester guilty of sleepin round like a skank and gettin knocked up. Now she gotta sport a red “A” on her threadz to signify “Adultery.”Animation: Hester holding her baby. The peoples be all like “Yo slut, you best fess up the name of yo baby daddy.” But Hester keeps it street and don’t snitch.While she bein all hated on by the hood, she peeps her ol hubby in the crowd, who til now she thought got ganked at sea.This fool get all crunk and say that the man she hoin it up with gotta get his comeuppance too. So he go by the fake name of Doc Chillingworth and hit the streets to find the fool who banged his woman.After Hester get released from the slammer, she shacks up in some dingy-ass digs with her baby girl Pearl.

The local preacher man Dimmsdale gets all sick and Doc Chill start nursin him when he think: “Maybe this fool ill cuz he got some fessin to do.So one night Chilly scope him out while he sleepin and see a big red A on his chest. Now Chilly knows who been raw-doggin Hester.Then Hester gets tired of Chilly bustin her baby daddy’s balls, and axe him to stop hatin. But Chilly be all like “Can’t stop, won’t stop!” So Hester tell Dimmsdale that Chillingworth her old hubby.While Dimmsdale sermonizing, he sees Hester and Pearl in the crowd, loses his sh**, and starts tellin errybody that he’s Pearl’s daddy. Then he shrivels up and dies like a bitch. Since Chilly ain’t got nobody to fu** wit no more, he up and dies too. Years later, Hester goes back to her cottage in da boonies where she builds a rep for givin advice to other women. When she dies, she gets buried next to Dimmsdale with a big-ass “A” on their gravestone.Even the scrappiest hoods know that Hester’s A standin for Adultery, but listen good, blood. That ain’t all it means.

Like when Hester start doin righteous deeds for the community, homies start thinkin the A stands for “able.” And when peeps see a big “A” in the sky after Winthrop buys the farm, they thinkin it means “angel.”

But no matter how legit Hester play, dat “A” isolating her from all the other playas in town who frontin saying they all pure n uppity.

Ever since Adam took a bite out of dat apple and got his ass booted out of Eden, sin has isolated man from society, himself and even God. And since dem Puritains ain’t down with Hester’s bad self, she gotta live in a cottage in bum-fuck nowhere.

Chilly’s sin of vengeance gets so real, that he loses himself entirely. The narrator even say dat that with his vengeance all cashed out, he ain’t got nothin to do but go chill with Satan.

Sparky reads quote: “in short, there was no more Devil’s work on earth for him to do, it only remained for the unhumanized mortal to betake himself whither his Master would find him tasks enough, and pay him his wages duly.”

But the truth up in here is that all these self-righteous posers ain’t being real and admitting that they just as human as Hester. Cuz no matter how hard you try to stick to the straight and narrow, actin out is part of human nature. Anybody that say they never trip in the face of temptation is the real lying trick.

So what Hawthorne might be sayin is: If errybody is a sinner, shouldn’t we stop hating so much whenever someone fucks up?

Cuz if you gonna say life is based on love and compassion, you gotta know how to forgive, playa.

Stay in school, say no to drugs, and tell all your friends bout Thug Notes. Catch you next week!

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