Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Crime and Punishment Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. This week’s episode is Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky.

Crime and Punishment (1866) | Written by: Fyodor Dostoyevsky |
Published by: The Russian Messenger

Crime and Punishment
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

What it do blood? Welcome to Thug Notes, yo main hookup for classical literature summary and analysis. This here yo boy Sparky Sweets, PHD. This week we keepin it real with Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. C&P is the story of one of the baddest white boys in western literature, mah boy Roskalnikov, or “Rodya,” as he like to be called. Now Rodya be livin a broke ass student in the hood of St. Petersburg. One day he rolls up to the house of some ol’ crusty pawnbroker hag to slang some of his bling for that rent money. After this ho does my boy straight dirty, he goes to the local pub where he overhears some other hustlas talkin mess about this old hag- how she abuses her sister Lizaveta and hordes mad cash.

Man, it sure would be cold and righteous if some badass mutha just went up and glocked that bitch. Do society a favor, and give her money to the po’. Naw mean? So Rodya steps up. Grabs his self an axe. Rolls up to the pawnbroker’s crib and BAM, he straight mercs that bitch like a cold blooded gangsta. Just when he bout to bounce, her sister rolls in. Now my honky be knowin you can’t be leavin no witnesses. Pop! Pop! That bitch goes down and Rodya bails before the po-lice arrive.

Days pass and mah boy Rodya tries to shake the funk of murdering someone. News comes that a detective by the name of Porfiry Petrovich wanna holla at our boy. Oh snap! So as our homie arrives at the police station, Rodya thinks about crackin down and confessing like a little bitch. Man just play it cool brutha!As soon as Porfiry meets Rodya, he whips out the big guns and recalls an article that Rodya wrote called “On Crime” in which Rodya theorizes that some playas be baller enough to kill for the sake of the common good. ‘Das right. Some ballas be thuggin so righteous that they have the right to ice a homie. But Rodya doesn’t fall for the trap and shakes off that player hater.

Still tortured by his whack-ass deed, Rodya seeks solace in the arms of some nasty trick named Sonya. Feelin all guilty, Rodya asks Sonya to read him the story of Lazarus. Next day, Rodya pays a visit to the fuzz. Porfiry Petrovich lays down the gauntlet and says “Rodya, stop frontin, I know it was you that killed these bitches.” Just when he bout to give in to the guilt and confess, some cracked out fool named Nikolai busts in and confesses to the murder. Porfiry don’t buy it but lets Rodya off the hook. Woo! That was close!Now that some other poor bastard is takin the fall for the murder, Rodya be buggin out hard core. So he goes back to that ho Sonya and admits that he is the murderer.

Sonya gets all crunk and tells him that he gotta turn his self in to the po-po in order for God to forgive him.So Rodya goes to the middle of the market and kisses the ground to beg god for forgiveness. Then he confesses to Porfiry and is pinched by the 5-O. Only the hard labor of prison life in Siberia can give our boy Rodya salvation.Whoa we ain’t finished yet, playa! If you wanna roll with da big dawgs, gots to do da damn thang and stick around for da critical analysis section.Now if yo bitch ass be paying attention, you mighta noticed that Rodya’s article “On Crime” sounds a lot like Nietzche’s writings on the Ubermensch in “Thus Spake Zarathrusta.” You might even say that Dostoevsky’s conclusion that one must embrace suffering to achieve redemption in the eyes of God is a big “fu** you” to Nietzche’s postmodern nihilism. Ya hear me?

Peep this motif, son: the recurring disjoint between contemplation and experience. At first, My dawg Rodya thinks he knows what’s up just cuz it sound all good and righteous in his head. Turns out this fool is just some punk ass poser that don’t actually know nuthin until he actually lives it. For example, homeboy think he can ghost a bitch and not trip. But, on the real, actually killin a bitch is too much for this pimpjuice to bear. Homie can’t be accepting Jesus just by thinking about it.
Naw, you gotta straight up suffer like Christ did in the bible. Preach!Yo this is real talk right here: the Christian symbolism is underlined by the pagan symbols of the earth. When dat ho Sonya tells Rodya to confess, she tells him to kiss the ground- acknowledging the earth as the baby mama of all men.

It’s like this stunna is making the transition from a cold, hard ass rationalist in to an red blooded human being. Ya heard?Some scholarly gangsta by the name of Berdyaev once said that “The case of Rodya illustrates the crisis of humanism, what its morality leads to, the suicide of man by self affirmation.” Now I haven’t the slightest clue what the hell that means, but what I think this baby dick mutha be trying to say is that if you be thinkin you special, that you above the law, then you sure as hell got another thing coming. And when yo thug ass hits rock bottom, you’ll be able to truly understand religious morality homie.

You also best be lookin out for Dostoevsky’s use of duality up in this heezy. First off, Roskalnikov’s name straight up means “schism,” which in basic english means divide. Now what this means is that my boy Rodya be playin both sides of the court in a whole bunch of ways throughout the book: sensibility and intelligence, self-sacrifice and self assertion, God-man and man-God, good and evil. I could go on, playa!Look, If you ain’t read this sh**, you best get yo ass to the library and get yoself a copy.
Thanks for tuning in to Thug Notes, blood. See you next week.

More Videos

The Glass Menagerie <br />by Tennessee Williams

The Glass Menagerie
by Tennessee Williams

Emma <br />by Jane Austen

Emma
by Jane Austen

IT <br />by Stephen King

IT
by Stephen King

Best Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems Stories in Lit

Best Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems Stories in Lit

Ready Player One <br />by Ernest Cline

Ready Player One
by Ernest Cline

Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde <br />by Robert Louis Stevenson

Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Dr. Seuss’s Horton Hears A Who! <br />by Maurice Sendak

Dr. Seuss’s Horton Hears A Who!
by Maurice Sendak

Where the Wild Things Are <br />by Maurice Sendak

Where the Wild Things Are
by Maurice Sendak

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest <br />by Ken Kesey

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
by Ken Kesey

The Merchant of Venice <br />by William Shakespeare

The Merchant of Venice
by William Shakespeare

The Trial <br />by Franz Kafka

The Trial
by Franz Kafka

Madame Bovary <br />by Gustave Flaubert

Madame Bovary
by Gustave Flaubert

The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Fall of the House of Usher <br />by Edgar Allan Poe

The Fall of the House of Usher
by Edgar Allan Poe

A Wrinkle in Time <br />by Madeleine L’Engle

A Wrinkle in Time
by Madeleine L’Engle

Fight Club <br />by Chuck Palahniuk

Fight Club
by Chuck Palahniuk

The Cask of Amontillado <br />by Edgar Allan Poe

The Cask of Amontillado
by Edgar Allan Poe

American Psycho <br />by Bret Easton Ellis

American Psycho
by Bret Easton Ellis

The Fountainhead <br />by Ayn Rand

The Fountainhead
by Ayn Rand

Where the Red Fern Grows <br />by Wilson Rawls

Where the Red Fern Grows
by Wilson Rawls

Life of Pi <br />by Yann Martel

Life of Pi
by Yann Martel

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy <br />by Douglas Adams

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
by Douglas Adams

Les Misérables <br />by Victor Hugo

Les Misérables
by Victor Hugo

No Country for Old Men <br />by Cormac McCarthy

No Country for Old Men
by Cormac McCarthy

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe <br />by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe
by C.S. Lewis

Don Quixote <br />by Miguel de Cervantes

Don Quixote
by Miguel de Cervantes

V for Vendetta <br />by Alan Moore

V for Vendetta
by Alan Moore

The Fellowship of the Ring <br />by J. R. R. Tolkein

The Fellowship of the Ring
by J. R. R. Tolkein

Ender’s Game <br />by Orson Scott Card

Ender’s Game
by Orson Scott Card

Doctor Faustus <br />by Christopher Marlowe

Doctor Faustus
by Christopher Marlowe

Go Set A Watchman <br />by Harper Lee

Go Set A Watchman
by Harper Lee

The Outsiders <br />by S.E. Hinton

The Outsiders
by S.E. Hinton

The Goldfinch <br />by Donna Tartt

The Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt

A Midsummer Night’s Dream <br />by William Shakespeare

A Midsummer Night’s Dream
by William Shakespeare

A Game of Thrones <br />by George R. R. Martin

A Game of Thrones
by George R. R. Martin

King Lear by William Shakespeare

King Lear by William Shakespeare

Watchmen by Alan Moore

Watchmen by Alan Moore

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

Gone Girl <br> written by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl
written by Gillian Flynn

The Handmaid’s Tale<br>by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale
by Margaret Atwood

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Alice in Wonderland<br>by Lewis Carroll

Alice in Wonderland
by Lewis Carroll

Fifty Shades of Grey <br> by E.L. James

Fifty Shades of Grey
by E.L. James

The Tell-Tale Heart <br>by Edgar Allan Poe

The Tell-Tale Heart
by Edgar Allan Poe

The Color Purple <br> by Alice Walker

The Color Purple
by Alice Walker

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Beloved by Toni Morrison

A Raisin in the Sun <br> by Lorraine Hansberry

A Raisin in the Sun
by Lorraine Hansberry

A Tale of Two Cities <br> by Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities
by Charles Dickens

The Raven <br> by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven
by Edgar Allan Poe

A Christmas Carol <br> by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol
by Charles Dickens

Othello <br> by William Shakespeare

Othello
by William Shakespeare

Death of a Salesman <br> by Arthur Miller

Death of a Salesman
by Arthur Miller

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Dracula by Bram Stoker

One Hundred Years of Solitude <br> by Gabriel García Márquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude
by Gabriel García Márquez

The Metamorphosis <br> by Franz Kafka

The Metamorphosis
by Franz Kafka

The Hunger Games<br>by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games
by Suzanne Collins

The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver by Lois Lowry

At The Mountains of Madness<br>by H. P. Lovecraft

At The Mountains of Madness
by H. P. Lovecraft

Dune by Frank Herbert

Dune by Frank Herbert

The Dark Knight / The Grand Inquisitor – Special Episode

The Dark Knight / The Grand Inquisitor – Special Episode

The Brothers Karamazov <br> by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Brothers Karamazov
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Grapes of Wrath<br>by John Steinbeck

The Grapes of Wrath
by John Steinbeck

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

The Old Man and the Sea<br>by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea
by Ernest Hemingway

The Stranger by Albert Camus

The Stranger by Albert Camus

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

The Sound and the Fury<br>by William Faulkner

The Sound and the Fury
by William Faulkner

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Ethan Frome <br> by Edith Wharton

Ethan Frome
by Edith Wharton

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Grendel by John Gardner

Grendel by John Gardner

Things Fall Apart<br>by Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart
by Chinua Achebe

Slaughterhouse-Five<br>by Kurt Vonnegut

Slaughterhouse-Five
by Kurt Vonnegut

A Separate Peace <br> by John Knowles

A Separate Peace
by John Knowles

Oedipus The King by Sophocles

Oedipus The King by Sophocles

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

The Picture of Dorian Gray <br> by Oscar Wilde

The Picture of Dorian Gray
by Oscar Wilde

Wuthering Heights<br>by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights
by Emily Brontë

Romeo and Juliet <br> by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet
by William Shakespeare

Notes from Underground<br>by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Notes from Underground
by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Invisible Man <br> by Ralph Ellison

Invisible Man
by Ralph Ellison

The Sun Also Rises<br>by Ernest Hemingway

The Sun Also Rises
by Ernest Hemingway

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Dante’s Inferno

Dante’s Inferno

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Heart of Darkness <br> by Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness
by Joseph Conrad

Frankenstein <br> by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein
by Mary Shelley

The Scarlet Letter<br>by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter
by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Homer’s Odyssey

Homer’s Odyssey

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Animal Farm <br> by George Orwell

Animal Farm
by George Orwell

Beowulf

Beowulf

Brave New World <br> by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World
by Aldous Huxley

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

Hamlet <br> by William Shakespeare

Hamlet
by William Shakespeare

Jane Eyre <br> by Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre
by Charlotte Brontë

The Catcher in the Rye<br> by J.D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye
by J.D. Salinger

Great Expectations <br> by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations
by Charles Dickens

Lord of the Flies<br>by William Golding

Lord of the Flies
by William Golding

Pride and Prejudice <br> by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen

1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)<br> by George Orwell

1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
by George Orwell

To Kill a Mockingbird <br> By Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird
By Harper Lee

The Great Gatsby <br> by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Crime and Punishment<br> by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Crime and Punishment
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky