Inferno by Dante Alighieri

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ Dante’s Inferno Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more. This week’s episode is Inferno by Dante Alighieri.

Inferno (1317) | Written by: Dante Alighieri | Published by: Anchor

Dante’s Inferno
Thug Notes Summary and Analysis

Whaddap whaddap? This week on Thug Notes it’s gettin hella hot with Dante’s Inferno.

Dante must have blacked out or something cuz dis fool lost in the woods and don’t even know how he got there.He keeps truckin along til three gnarly beasties start mad doggin him. sh**’s bout to get real til the poet Virgil saves his ass and tell him he been sent by his old biddy Beatrice who boppin up in heaven.

Dante starts trippin when he hears the screams of da Uncommitted- peeps who didn’t do sh** with their lives. But his guide, Virgil, tells him to stop being a bitch and start their journey through the 9 circles of Hell. After gettin straight clocked out, Dante wakes up in Limbo- the first circle. This hood filled with all da righteous souls who lived before Christianity or never got they selves baptized. The second circle be full of lustful peeps who just couldn’t keep it in their pants. Up in here, Minos sorts all dem sinners in to the right circles.Up in the third circle be all the gluttons. Whether it be sippin too much drank, blowin too much dank, or grubbin too hard, all deez fools gettin served by Cerberus.

The fourth circle packed with all dem greedy shysters who don’t do nothin but chase paper. And the fifth got all da wrathful souls scrappin on the surface of the Styx river. Then our hero rolls up to the city of Dis. Behind these walls lie homies who dun REALLY fu**ed up. In the sixth circle, Dante peeps all the heretics get lit up in red-hot sepulchres. The seventh circle spillin over with homies who been violent towards others, themselves, and God.

Then Dante and Virgil hop on a three-headed monster called Geryon, who takes em to Malebolge- the eighth circle. This crib sportin all dem fakers who been frontin with magic, astrology and otha sh** gettin put in their place.

Then our boys swang over to the ice-cold 9th circle of Hell; where Satan himself be torturin all them snitch traitors of history. Virgil and Dante decide they gonna peace out and slide down The Beast’s body to Purgatory.

This poem be the first part of Dante’s three-part Divine Comedy. But it ain’t called a comedy cuz Dante got jokes. Naw.Most scholarly hoods point out that literary comedy starts out with some real twisted sh** but ends up all good in the hood. And Dante’s whole shebang starts off in Hell and ends in Paradise. Listen up blood cuz Dante layin all sorts of allegory on yo bitch ass. On one level, The Inferno representin all the temptation mankind gotta rough through in order to find salvation. Dante trying to find God thinkin it ain’t no thang, but the true path blocked by three slobberin beasts. And dem haters symbolize all the sins Dante gotta overcome he can smoke and sip with the big G.

But dat ain’t the only allegory Dante pimpin. Not only is he talkin spiritual, but he also talkin political. See in 1302, Dante got stright exiled outta Florene during a coup. And as a result, fool was just sliding aimlessly from spot to spot for the rest of his days.

So the dark wood that Dante gets lost in not only representin his spirit searching for God, but also his wandering days after gettin exiled. But of all historical poets, why did Dante choose Virgil to guide him through the underworld? Well back in the day, Virgil wrote bout how Troy’s fall led to the establishment of Rome. And just as the beginning of the Trojan’s journey to Rome was a raw grind, Dante had to man the fu** up and roll through Hell and Purgatory before getting to Heaven.

Hey thanks for kickin it with your boy. Don’t stop reading and check me out next week.

More Videos

The Glass Menagerie <br />by Tennessee Williams

The Glass Menagerie
by Tennessee Williams

Emma <br />by Jane Austen

Emma
by Jane Austen

IT <br />by Stephen King

IT
by Stephen King

Best Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems Stories in Lit

Best Mo’ Money, Mo’ Problems Stories in Lit

Ready Player One <br />by Ernest Cline

Ready Player One
by Ernest Cline

Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde <br />by Robert Louis Stevenson

Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Dr. Seuss’s Horton Hears A Who! <br />by Maurice Sendak

Dr. Seuss’s Horton Hears A Who!
by Maurice Sendak

Where the Wild Things Are <br />by Maurice Sendak

Where the Wild Things Are
by Maurice Sendak

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest <br />by Ken Kesey

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
by Ken Kesey

The Merchant of Venice <br />by William Shakespeare

The Merchant of Venice
by William Shakespeare

The Trial <br />by Franz Kafka

The Trial
by Franz Kafka

Madame Bovary <br />by Gustave Flaubert

Madame Bovary
by Gustave Flaubert

The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Fall of the House of Usher <br />by Edgar Allan Poe

The Fall of the House of Usher
by Edgar Allan Poe

A Wrinkle in Time <br />by Madeleine L’Engle

A Wrinkle in Time
by Madeleine L’Engle

Fight Club <br />by Chuck Palahniuk

Fight Club
by Chuck Palahniuk

The Cask of Amontillado <br />by Edgar Allan Poe

The Cask of Amontillado
by Edgar Allan Poe

American Psycho <br />by Bret Easton Ellis

American Psycho
by Bret Easton Ellis

The Fountainhead <br />by Ayn Rand

The Fountainhead
by Ayn Rand

Where the Red Fern Grows <br />by Wilson Rawls

Where the Red Fern Grows
by Wilson Rawls

Life of Pi <br />by Yann Martel

Life of Pi
by Yann Martel

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy <br />by Douglas Adams

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
by Douglas Adams

Les Misérables <br />by Victor Hugo

Les Misérables
by Victor Hugo

No Country for Old Men <br />by Cormac McCarthy

No Country for Old Men
by Cormac McCarthy

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe <br />by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe
by C.S. Lewis

Don Quixote <br />by Miguel de Cervantes

Don Quixote
by Miguel de Cervantes

V for Vendetta <br />by Alan Moore

V for Vendetta
by Alan Moore

The Fellowship of the Ring <br />by J. R. R. Tolkein

The Fellowship of the Ring
by J. R. R. Tolkein

Ender’s Game <br />by Orson Scott Card

Ender’s Game
by Orson Scott Card

Doctor Faustus <br />by Christopher Marlowe

Doctor Faustus
by Christopher Marlowe

Go Set A Watchman <br />by Harper Lee

Go Set A Watchman
by Harper Lee

The Outsiders <br />by S.E. Hinton

The Outsiders
by S.E. Hinton

The Goldfinch <br />by Donna Tartt

The Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt

A Midsummer Night’s Dream <br />by William Shakespeare

A Midsummer Night’s Dream
by William Shakespeare

A Game of Thrones <br />by George R. R. Martin

A Game of Thrones
by George R. R. Martin

King Lear by William Shakespeare

King Lear by William Shakespeare

Watchmen by Alan Moore

Watchmen by Alan Moore

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

Gone Girl <br> written by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl
written by Gillian Flynn

The Handmaid’s Tale<br>by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale
by Margaret Atwood

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse

Alice in Wonderland<br>by Lewis Carroll

Alice in Wonderland
by Lewis Carroll

Fifty Shades of Grey <br> by E.L. James

Fifty Shades of Grey
by E.L. James

The Tell-Tale Heart <br>by Edgar Allan Poe

The Tell-Tale Heart
by Edgar Allan Poe

The Color Purple <br> by Alice Walker

The Color Purple
by Alice Walker

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Beloved by Toni Morrison

A Raisin in the Sun <br> by Lorraine Hansberry

A Raisin in the Sun
by Lorraine Hansberry

A Tale of Two Cities <br> by Charles Dickens

A Tale of Two Cities
by Charles Dickens

The Raven <br> by Edgar Allan Poe

The Raven
by Edgar Allan Poe

A Christmas Carol <br> by Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol
by Charles Dickens

Othello <br> by William Shakespeare

Othello
by William Shakespeare

Death of a Salesman <br> by Arthur Miller

Death of a Salesman
by Arthur Miller

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Dracula by Bram Stoker

One Hundred Years of Solitude <br> by Gabriel García Márquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude
by Gabriel García Márquez

The Metamorphosis <br> by Franz Kafka

The Metamorphosis
by Franz Kafka

The Hunger Games<br>by Suzanne Collins

The Hunger Games
by Suzanne Collins

The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver by Lois Lowry

At The Mountains of Madness<br>by H. P. Lovecraft

At The Mountains of Madness
by H. P. Lovecraft

Dune by Frank Herbert

Dune by Frank Herbert

The Dark Knight / The Grand Inquisitor – Special Episode

The Dark Knight / The Grand Inquisitor – Special Episode

The Brothers Karamazov <br> by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Brothers Karamazov
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Grapes of Wrath<br>by John Steinbeck

The Grapes of Wrath
by John Steinbeck

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

The Old Man and the Sea<br>by Ernest Hemingway

The Old Man and the Sea
by Ernest Hemingway

The Stranger by Albert Camus

The Stranger by Albert Camus

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

The Sound and the Fury<br>by William Faulkner

The Sound and the Fury
by William Faulkner

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Ethan Frome <br> by Edith Wharton

Ethan Frome
by Edith Wharton

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

Grendel by John Gardner

Grendel by John Gardner

Things Fall Apart<br>by Chinua Achebe

Things Fall Apart
by Chinua Achebe

Slaughterhouse-Five<br>by Kurt Vonnegut

Slaughterhouse-Five
by Kurt Vonnegut

A Separate Peace <br> by John Knowles

A Separate Peace
by John Knowles

Oedipus The King by Sophocles

Oedipus The King by Sophocles

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

The Picture of Dorian Gray <br> by Oscar Wilde

The Picture of Dorian Gray
by Oscar Wilde

Wuthering Heights<br>by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights
by Emily Brontë

Romeo and Juliet <br> by William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet
by William Shakespeare

Notes from Underground<br>by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Notes from Underground
by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Invisible Man <br> by Ralph Ellison

Invisible Man
by Ralph Ellison

The Sun Also Rises<br>by Ernest Hemingway

The Sun Also Rises
by Ernest Hemingway

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

The Crucible by Arthur Miller

Dante’s Inferno

Dante’s Inferno

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Macbeth by William Shakespeare

Heart of Darkness <br> by Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness
by Joseph Conrad

Frankenstein <br> by Mary Shelley

Frankenstein
by Mary Shelley

The Scarlet Letter<br>by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter
by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Homer’s Odyssey

Homer’s Odyssey

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Moby Dick by Herman Melville

Animal Farm <br> by George Orwell

Animal Farm
by George Orwell

Beowulf

Beowulf

Brave New World <br> by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World
by Aldous Huxley

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

Hamlet <br> by William Shakespeare

Hamlet
by William Shakespeare

Jane Eyre <br> by Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre
by Charlotte Brontë

The Catcher in the Rye<br> by J.D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye
by J.D. Salinger

Great Expectations <br> by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations
by Charles Dickens

Lord of the Flies<br>by William Golding

Lord of the Flies
by William Golding

Pride and Prejudice <br> by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice
by Jane Austen

1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)<br> by George Orwell

1984 (Nineteen Eighty-Four)
by George Orwell

To Kill a Mockingbird <br> By Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird
By Harper Lee

The Great Gatsby <br> by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Crime and Punishment<br> by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Crime and Punishment
by Fyodor Dostoyevsky