The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

From plot debriefs to key motifs, Thug Notes’ The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe Summary & Analysis has you covered with themes, symbols, important quotes, and more.

The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe (1950) | Written by: C.S. Lewis

The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe
Thug Notes Summary & Analysis

What’s good young thugs? This week we keepiní it church with the Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis.

War is RAGIN through the streets of London, so the Pevensie kids- Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy, gotta pack up they shit and head to the boonies to live wit crazy Professor Kirke.

Lilí Lucy jusí scopin the crib and decide to hop up in a bruthaís wardrobe when ZAP- girl in a Magical Forrest up in this magical hood called Narnia. WHOA. Lucy roll up to a lamppost and start conversatiní with a faun named Mr. Tumnus. Mr. T like ìWanna poí up some tea over at my crib?î (lucy) ìOh. Aight. Word.î Thing is, though, Tumnus ainít jusí havin a girl over to do some sippiní: he break down and tell Lucy dat he was plottiní to turn her over to the evil White Witch. This bad bitch been ruliní over Narnia foí years and usiní dem swoel powers to make it always Winter, but never Christmas. Thatís some bullshit. Tumnus was gonna hand Lucy over, but since she just so damn real, he let her go.

When Lucy pop outta da wardrobe and start telliní errybody else bout Narnia, they all like ìGirl is you rollin?!?î- ëspecially her broEdmond. Later, while the kids playing Hide Ní Seek, Lucy and Edmond get all up in that wardrobe and ZOW!- back to Narnia. Edmond forgets all bout his little sistah and starts flyiní solo. Outta nowhere, the White Witch rolls up on him and girl slips him some magical Turkish Delight datísTHE DANK. He like ìLady. Gimme SUMMOí of DATî- but she say ìnuh-uh playboy. I ainít giviní you shit until you bring all your brothas and sistahs to me. You do that, and I ainít only gonna give you all da Turkish Delight you want, but Iíll make you Prince of da land.î Sounds pretty tight to me.

After some hardcore chilliní with Mr. Tumnus, Lucy find Edmond and they head back home. But Edmond keep his mouth shut bout da witch. Back at da crib, Lucy like ìGuess where we been bitches? Narnia! Back me up, bro. Tell em.î But Edmund like ìPsh I donít know what this girl talkin ëboutî. if you ainít figgered it out yet, Edmundís a dick. So Peter and Lucy hit up the Doc and ask him who to believe. Professor Kirke gets real wit em and say: 1. Who you REALLY gonna believe? Lucy? Or Edmund? And 2. Maybe erryone should just mind they own damn business. Nice.

Eventually all four of dem kids go through the wardrobe and head to Tumnusís pad, but turns out, dat horny brutha got GOT by the law for beiní tight with humans. Later, they hit up the house of Mr. Beaver who lay down some COLD prophecy: da only way to defeat the white witch and her bitch-ass magic is foí foí humans to take the throne. And according to Mr. Beav, she ainít even da legit ruler of da land. Da real dude in charge is Aslan the Lion. Ainít nobody seen this playa foí years, but word is he back in town.

Jonezin to live the ballerís dream, Edmund sneaks out to the White Witchís place to get so moí sweets but she like ìBoy didnít I tell yoí dumbass to bring da kids with you?î She just bout shits herself when she learns dat Aslan back. AWW YEAH ASLAAAN!

Back at the Beaver digs, Lucy start lookiní round and realize dat Edmond peaced out all shady-like. Big Beav say Edmund musta sold they asses out to the white witch and like ìShe probably know where we are so best book it out of here befoí she come up in here and fuck my shit up. Letís go find Aslan.î

While they on da road, they see dat the snowís startiní to melt, cuz the White witchís power over the land be SLIPPINí. All the sudden, they run in to muthafuckiní Santa Claus. Olí Papa Christmas slangin presents like he do: Lucy get a dagger and some magic drank that can heal da injured, Susan get a bow and a special horn, and Peter get a pretty tight sword ní shield.

When they lilí crew reach the Stone Table where Aslan dun set up shop, errybody meet da big Lion himself and agree he a pretty trill dude. But when the queenís top dawg, a wolf named Maugrim, drop in tryna merc Susan, Peter like ìHAEEEEEEL NOî and ghosts that pooch with his blade. A crew of Aslanís thugs follow anothaí wolf back to the queen and save Edmond RIGHT before da witch was bout to ice dat boy.

Edmund gets back to Aslanís spot but then da Queen herself roll up and say ì Yo. Aslan. Donít yo stupid ass know that according to some old-ass law called ëdeep magicí dat I got the RIGHT to kill Edmund since he a lilí snitch. Erry traitorís ass belongs to ME- and if I donít get it, all of Narnia gonna get wrecked by fire and water.î Aslan like ìgirl. Can I hollaí at you for a second?î

After they done conversating, da Queen decides to just chill and let Edmund live. That night, Aslan creep outta da camp but Lucy and Susan hot on his trail. Turns out, Aslan gonna trade his own life foí Edmondís. Way to fuck shit up Edmond! Whitey and her crew treat Aslan like shit, call him a pussy (seriously- check out p.153), And finally shank his lion ass. Woo. He dead. But donít trip, cuz after some tears, a few rope-eating mice, and a stone table breaking, we find out dat Aslan comes back to life. Apparently Aslan fuckiní with an even DEEPER magic from way back befoí there was even time (show Flava Flav with his clock).

So Lucy and Susan ride Aslan back to the Queenís castle when Aslan starts healin people who been turned in to statues. Aslan gets all these peeps to meet up with Edmund and Peter, who trynaí wreck shop on the White Witch with a army of they own. Afta the dust settle, the Pevensie kids sit they asses on dem thrones and become da kings and queens of Narnia. Swag. Aslan bout to leave when the kids like ìAslan. Donít leave.î And Aslan like ìBitch Iím fuckin Aslan Iíll do what I damn well please.î

Years later, they all find the lamppost and ZOOP- they back in da real world as kids. They like ìYo professor. You ainít gonna BELIEVE da shit we just seenî brutha like ìWord. I bet you gonna be back there soon enoughî

With all this talking animals and magic jive, it sound like olí CS mighta been hotboxing his wardrobe. But according to Lewis da whole idea started with an image in his mind of a Faun packin an UM-brella and parcels cruisiní through some snowy woods. And on the real, CS Lewis actually pulled a Professor Kirke liviní in the country during the war and giviní evacuees a place to crash. Apparently one of the kids stayiní with him was always axin Lewis bout his wardrobe… so (lightbulb appears on top of Lewisís head).

But dis book ainít just bout saving children, but SAVING themî- straight Jesus style. Cuz you KNOW CS Lewis like to keep it church. All da backward-ass shit dat Edmond do in da book reppiní da ways dat humanity can be tempted in to a life of sin; and dat even though the man upstairs gonna forgive you, you might have to beast through some gnarly shit to get there. The cross ainít light. Naw mean?

Jusí look at Edmund: after the white witch promise him a life of sittin high baller on da throne grubbin on dank sweets all day erryday, brutha ready to backstab his own fam like it donít matter. Thang is, Edmund donít even get close to liviní dat high life. What CS preachin here is dat a life of sin may seem like it gonna give you da life of yo dreams, but truth is, it never do.

Thereís only one hustla dat can give you legit joy in life- Aslan, da nappy Jesus lion. Just peep these similarities between dat puss and the big JC, son:

Aslan sacrifice himself to save someone else, heís gets hated on right befoí his death:

QUOTE*****

They roll Aslan ìover on his back and tied all his four paws together, shouting and cheering as if they had done something brave, though, had the Lion chosen, one of those paws could have been the death of them all. But he made no noise, even when the enemies, straining and tugging, pulled the cords so tight that they cut into his flesh. (153)

END QUOTE*****

Plus,he gets resurrected, and wit dat ressurrection, lays down a new code- a DIVINE code that makes magic look like it ainít shit. Lion Jesus even use his breath to turn the White Witchís statues back in to living creatures, which is an analogy dat Lewis actually use in his book Mere Christianity.

QUOTE*****

ìAnd that is precisely what Christianity is about. This world is a great sculptorís shop. We are the statues and there is a rumour going round the shop that some of us are some day going to come to life.î (Mere Christianity)

END QUOTE*****

And if all dis holy rollin ainít obvious enough, Lewis say in ìVoyage of the Dawn Treaderî that Aslan got a different name in our world- someone who arrived in our world the same time as Santa Claus, was the son of an Emperor, was merced for someone elseís fault, came back to life, and is sometimes referred to as a lamb. HM. I WONDER WHO HE TALKINí BOUT.

But look, jusí cuz we got a bunch of similarities like deez donít mean we dealiní with a straight up allegory. There are some pretty important differences. For one, Jesus died for EVERYONE in da hood, where as Aslan died just for Edmund. As Lewis say, the Chronicles are ìsupposal.î What he meant by that is this: suppose that the Christian God had created a whole different world dat needed rescuing. How might he go bout savin dat world like he saved ours?

Truth is, what really matters is the message: thereís a right path to go down, but foí some reason, we donít always take it. Homies gonna trip, and we gonna need the love and sacrifice of somebody else so we can get back to rollin righteous.

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