The Philosophy of Daenerys Targaryen – Wisecrack Edition

We all know that Game of Thrones is just that… a game for the Iron Throne. But with all the time spent theorizing on who WILL win the Seven Kingdoms, we decided to take a different approach and pose the question: Who is actually FIT to rule the Seven Kingdoms? In this Wisecrack Edition, we focus on the Queen of Dragons herself, Daenerys Targaryen. Through the lens of political philosopher Niccolò Machiavelli, we evaluate Daenerys’s leadership skills utilizing three of his most famous texts: The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and The Art of War. How does the Breaker of Chains stack up? Let’s find out!

Written by: Claire Pickard
Narrated by: Jared Bauer
Directed by: Robert Tiemstra
Edited by: Ryan Hailey (http://www.ryanhaileydotcom.com/)
Assistant Editor: Andrew Nishimura
Motion Graphics by: Drew Levin
Produced by: Emily Dunbar

The Philosophy of Daenerys Targaryen – Wisecrack Edition

Hey Wisecrack, Jared again. Today we’re talking about one fierce lady with a lot of names: Daenerys Stormborn of the House Targaryen, Mother of Dragons, First of Her Name, the Unburnt, Queen of the Andals and the First Men, Khaleesi of the Great Grass Sea, Breaker of Chains, and Subject of A Thousand Fantasies. “Take off your clothes.” I don’t need to tell you that Game of Thrones is about the game for the throne, which is mostly political posturing with a few really expensive battles. But with so many characters vying for the Iron Throne, there’s often more discussion on who will win the Seven Kingdoms, rather than on who would actually be the best at ruling them. It’s pretty much impossible to do that comparison in a single video, so right now we’ll just focus on Daenerys. Her speeches are grand and her dragons are big, but is she actually an effective leader? She left some pretty big messes in Slaver’s Bay that may cast doubt on her ability as a monarch, but people do bow to her a lot. So today, we’re going to grade her Queen skills with some help from one of philosophy’s favorite antiheros, Niccolò Machiavelli. Welcome to this Wisecrack Edition on the Philosophy of Daenerys Targaryen. And of course — spoilers ahead.

Machiavelli is one of the founders of political philosophy, and he spent most of his time studying the qualities of good leadership: the traits that make a person most capable of achieving success for not only the state, but for themselves. He outlines these through three books: “The Prince,” “The Art of War” — not that one! — and “Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livy.” While all these texts focus on different aspects of being the big dog, today we’re going to focus on three that they’re all pretty consistent in valuing: liberty, the support of the people, and a little something called Virtù. Now, I know you’re probably thinking: Machiavelli? Caring about liberty? Did the Wisecrack office have a gas leak, or something? Well, just bear with us. So, how does Daenerys stack up? The Mother of Dragons is pretty famous for sticking to her guns on just about everything — or at least pretending she does. She’s guided by a strict moral compass that says, “no slavery, no dead children, wrong is wrong, and no asking me questions.”

Sounds okay so far, but it means that she sometimes struggles to adapt when faced with situations that demand flexibility, like whether or not to pardon someone who kills a known terrorist. Machiavelli calls this ability to adapt Virtù. He builds it up as the most important trait in a leader, but more than that, Virtù is about having the grit and fortitude to combat the various uncontrollable circumstances that roll your way — otherwise know as Fortuna. For Machiavelli, politics is not about laying meticulous plans years in advance, or always getting exactly what you want, but dealing with the cruel assh*le that is Fortune. To quote some other assh*le from some other century, the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry, and the ruler with Virtù is ready to adeptly turn these misfortunes into victory — no matter what it takes. Whether she realizes it or not, Daenerys is well-acquainted with the battle between Virtù and Fortuna. Her whole childhood was one bit of bad fortune after the next — being shuttled around to strangers, sold to a Khal against her will, and thrust into a new world where she doesn’t speak the language.

Yet, she’s able to adapt to the events of Fortuna and even use them to gain strength. In less than a year, she turns her forced Dothraki marriage into a powerful political position, and then turns the death of her beloved husband into an opportunity to lead her own khalasar. But once she actually has power, she gets weird about it. Danaerys is super uncompromising about slavery, which is great, but her moral absolutism undermines her own goals. After conquering Yunkai and Astapor, and freeing their slaves, she peaces out to her next project. Since she never bothers to establish any kind of tenable power structure, they collapse and return to slavery, or similar, as soon as she is gone. “The masters have retaken both cities. Outside of Meereen, the whole of Slaver’s Bay has returned to the slavers.”

Virtù means doing whatever is necessary for the good of the society, not following your ethical tunnel vision into a very sh*tty tunnel. In Season 5, she turns down a peace offer that would give freedom to the Yunkai slaves and stop the conflict between her army in Meereen and the Wise Masters of Yunkai. But she turns this down because she doesn’t want to reopen the fighting pits, even for freed slaves who still want to fight. She’s so unwilling to negotiate outside her moral comfort zone that she endangers pretty much everyone and everything she claims to care about. In a rare moment of compromise, she allows a freed slave to sell himself back to his master. “I will allow you to sign a contract with your former master. It may not cover a period lasting longer than a year.” But even this compromise highlights how Danaerys dogmatism is self-defeating: the old man was escaping the temporary shelters she had created for freed slaves that were even worse than the houses of their former masters. “I went to one of these places. The young prey on the old. Take what they want and beat us if we resist.” Tyrion, on the other hand, is the very embodiment of virtù as he leads Meereen while Daenerys is kidnapped. He negotiates with three cities to phase out, rather than out-right abolish, slavery, so that masked assassins will stop roaming the city. “We do not support the sons of the Harpy.” “Fine, fine. But you will cut it off all the same.” Tyrion is not about letting his moral inclinations get in the way of creating a stable society. “You’re right. Slavery is a horror that should be ended at once. War is a horror that should be ended at once. I can’t do both today.”

Does this treaty get immediately broken? Well, it sure does. But at least he showed the ability to adapt his strategies in the face of Fortuna. Daenerys, on the other hand, has exactly one strategy, and it’s called, “Yell A Lot and Burn Stuff.” That’s not always a bad strategy. The good ol “yell and burn” has gotten Daenerys out of being kidnapped, snagged her 8,000 Unsullied soldiers, saved Meereen from warships, and earned her the loyalty of the Dothraki not once, but twice. Machiavelli tells us that boldness and violence are often necessary for mastering Fortuna, and Danaerys certainly passes that part of the test. However, this approach isn’t just a matter of reacting to circumstance: you can’t always go around figuring out how to beat fortune, once it’s already shit on your lawn. Instead, mastering fortuna requires foresight, and pre-emptive action, like beating Fortuna to the punch and shitting on its lawn first.

That’s not to say Daenerys always lacks the ability to plan. After the owner of the Unsullied refuses her offer of ships and gold, she trades her dragon for an army of Unsullied and then actually just kills the master and takes both. It might seem underhanded and possibly evil, but it was the only feasible way to achieve her goals and give liberty to thousands in the process. Some of her shining moments of adapting to circumstance are during battle. Her acquisition of the Unsullied and the subsequent Sack of Astapor demonstrate that she can take advantage of opportunities that present themselves, and her decision to arm the slaves of Meereen during the siege of the city is Machiavelli-approved on multiple grounds. On one hand, it’s strategically sound since she risks fewer of her own soldiers. But beyond that, a wise leader recognizes that citizens will always fight for their own liberty, and one can use that to their own advantage. More on that in a minute. With a few exceptions, Daenerys isn’t exactly a roll-with-the-punches kinda Queen. “Where are my dragons?” Not being able to adapt your moral code in times of necessity is a recipe for trouble, as we’ve seen again and again and again. “My father, one of Meereen’s most respected and beloved citizens, oversaw the restoration and maintenance of its greatest landmarks . This pyramid included.” “For that, he has my gratitude. I should be honored to meet him.” “You have, your grace. You crucified him.”

So, I’m gonna pull a grade out of my ass and give her a C for virtù. Next up is Liberty. Daenerys, the Breaker of Chains— who could be more into freedom? She bans slavery wherever she goes and holds open court with basically every single resident of Meereen. While “The Prince” was written as a how-to guide for directing power to, well, princes, Machiavelli strongly values liberty and, despite what you’ve heard, advocates for a vivere libero, or a constitutional republic that allows for civil liberties and civic participation for commoners. Machiavelli writes in “Discourses on Livy” that one should create order by facilitating communication between nobility and common people. Daenerys tells us over and over that she has no interest in replacing the slave masters by becoming yet another diabolical overlord. Although she can never let us forget that she is queen, “Politics is the art of compromise, your grace.” “I’m not a politician. I’m queen.” she does seem to be genuinely concerned with the wants and needs of her people.

Machiavelli’s advice is practical. People will always fight for liberty, both internally and externally, so you should probably just go ahead and give it to them and avoid all of the drama of getting ambushed in the fighting pits and such. In Machiavelli’s vision of a free republic, one of the most central goals is the protection of public discourse, especially in the form of debates. Settling conflict through rhetoric means that the people get to choose the best course of action for the well-being of the state. The idea is, it’s much harder to fool a thousand people than it is to fool one leader. While we don’t see much civilized public debate in the still-chaotic Meereen, Daenerys tries to show that she prioritizes discourse by including both former slaves and the former slave masters on her small council. Now, it’s true that she mostly ignores the advice from the former slave masters, but who can blame her? Well, Machiavelli can. He says that the only kinds of political systems that truly work for the good of the people are those with open discourse— discourse between nobles and commoners, between different competing interest groups. Basically everybody should be talking to everybody else to resolve problems, or else the only option is violence. Seems obvious, right?

But in Daenerys’s city, there isn’t really discourse with the old Meereenese families. She makes a show of paying attention to all sides but never takes their concerns about culture or the economy seriously. And, surprise, this leads to violence. You could argue that it’s fine since the majority of the city clearly wants to punish the old slave masters, but here’s where she really screws up: she doesn’t even listen to the majority of the people. It’s not like she spares the former slave who kills the Son of Harpy or finds better housing for the poor. But we can’t pretend that she’s doing it all for show; her problem is that she cares more about individual petitioners than about open debate. Daenerys’s vivere libero could use some work, but she definitely gets points for trying. We’re gonna go ahead and give her a B minus. Liberty correlates pretty strongly with popular support, and Machiavelli makes it clear that a ruler needs the people’s support in order to get power or keep power.

Heavy-handed dictatorship is usually fleeting. On the face of it, it looks like Daenerys has this one in the bag. I mean, people cheer at her everywhere she goes and call her “Mhysa.” The freed slaves are really into Mhysa. The problem with this is that freed slaves are not all of the people in Meereen, Yunkai, and Astapor. And the old slavers? Definitely not into Mhysa. You know the Machiavelli quote, “it’s better to be feared than loved?” Well, it’s not good to be hated. People try to kill you. And the Sons of the Harpy try to kill Dany pretty much every time that she’s occupying their city. Shocker — she swoops in on a dragon, uproots their way of life, and refuses to negotiate. This isn’t the first time someone’s tried to off her. King Robert tried to poison her with wine back in Season 1 — but, then again, attacks from foreign rulers are just a day in the life; rebellion from the people threatens the stability and legitimacy of the crown. But all those civil liberties we mentioned earlier serve a dual purpose. Not only will the people be more likely to support you, they’ll also be more likely to fight battles for you. That way, you get a free army of people who care about the cause. Machiavelli explains in “The Art of War” that mercenaries fighting for money probably won’t be excited to die for you in the way that true believers would. And, if you want to conquer the Seven Kingdoms, you’re gonna need people to die for you.

Take the Unsullied. They aren’t exactly sellswords when they’re first introduced; they’re slaves. They aren’t fighting for loyalty or religion. However, by freeing them, Daenerys has transformed them from unwilling mercenaries to dedicated soldiers who are now devoted to her cause. So far, they’ve been her best fighters and their leader, Grey Worm, is one of her most trusted advisors. So, while freeing the Unsullied could be just another shining symbol of Daenerys’s wokeness, it’s also strategic. It’s likely no accident that she leaves the mercenaries in Meereen when she ships off to Westeros with the troops that now very much believe in her. Something similar happens with the Dothraki horde. Rather than buying their support the way Viserys tried to, she earns it by burning their leaders to death and then going all exhibitionist in front of a collapsed temple filled with smoking corpses. Hey, whatever gets the job done. But this isn’t the first time she’s lead a group of Dothraki. In Season 2, she lead her small khalasar through the Red Waste, where the whole camp nearly died of thirst, hunger, and exposure. That’s almost impressively incompetent. And if it happens again, I wouldn’t count on a lot of support. It should be obvious, but Machiavelli reminds us, you don’t get the loyalty of the people if their basic needs aren’t met.

That means Daenerys needs to feed her soldiers, but it also hearkens back to the mistake of putting up the former slaves of Meereen in some hellish barracks. She freed tens of thousands of people in five seconds and then took even less time than that to create an infrastructure that could support those people. One of Daenerys’s strongest skills is getting the support of the people. Keeping that support turns out to be a bit more challenging. But, as of the end of Season 6, she’s sailing across the Narrow Sea with over 100,000 people who want to put her on the throne. So, we’re gonna go ahead and say she gets a B in popular support. So, here are our final thoughts on Daenerys — and we have a few. According to “The Art of War,” a leader should pursue the common good of the state while also seeking personal glory. Daenerys mostly just has the second one down. She thinks she cares about helping the former slaves, but obviously not that much since she did a shit job of it and mostly just talks about how she and her Dothraki squad are going to take back the throne that’s thousands of miles away once she’s done playing Pretend Queen on the practice fields of Essos. And, just for good measure, let’s address the fact that she constantly refers to Westeros as “that which is mine.” “I want them because they’re mine by right. The Iron Throne is mine, and I will take it.” Demanding respect simply because she is the “rightful heir” to the Iron Throne is in her Signature Moves list right up there with Yelling and Burning. As Machiavelli might say: “she trippin”. A ruler only gets real power through taking and earning and keeping it, not through inheritance. “Forgive me, Khaleesi, but your ancestor, Aegon the Conqueror didn’t seize six of the kingdoms because they were his right — he had no right to them — he seized them because he could.”

And here we land at the real question — what’s Daenerys’s plan when she gets to Westeros? The Dothraki and the Unsullied will do what they do best — and then what? Does she have a plan for feeding and housing the thousands of Unsullied, who are technically not her slaves but have no other job training or any other cultural knowledge of Westeros? Sure, battling Fortuna is more important than sticking to strict policies, but you have to start with some kind of strategy. And how about the Dothraki? Maybe they’ll kill and rape and raid and win the Seven Kingdoms, and then settle down and build some houses on newly-liberated Lannister land and start growing tomatoes. If the Northerners are up in arms over Wildling raids, imagine how Daenerys’s new subjects will feel about 100,000 Dothraki raiders murdering and pillaging every inch of the continent, long after the war is over. The consistent goal in all of Machiavelli’s work is political stability, which, as we can see, is not exactly Daenerys’s strong suit. Being a ruler isn’t just about hopping around from city to city for personal glory. It’s making sure that things run smoothly once they’re yours. “How can I rule seven kingdoms if I can’t control Slaver’s Bay?”

So, is Daenerys a good leader? We’ll, we’re gonna go ahead and give her a C+. Remember, virtù is weighted the heaviest of all factors. And she kind of sucks at it. Maybe it comes down to this — she’s really a Khaleesi, not a Queen. For the Dothraki, battle is a way of life, and Daenerys’s strategy of Yell and Burn Stuff is a pretty good one. And when she does show us virtù, it’s usually in a fight. Put her on a throne, and that’s where things start to falter. “You weren’t made to sit on a chair in a palace.” “What was I made for?” “You’re a conqueror, Daenerys Stormborn.”

Thanks a lot for watching, Wisecrack. Peace.

More Videos

The Haunting of Hill House: The Ghosts No One Is Talking About – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Haunting of Hill House: The Ghosts No One Is Talking About – Wisecrack Quick Take

Netflix’s MANIAC: Ranking Our 3 Interpretations – Wisecrack Edition

Netflix’s MANIAC: Ranking Our 3 Interpretations – Wisecrack Edition

Kanye and The End of Reality – Wisecrack Edition

Kanye and The End of Reality – Wisecrack Edition

South Park on Giving Up – Wisecrack Quick Take

South Park on Giving Up – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Satire of Red Dead Redemption – Wisecrack Edition

The Satire of Red Dead Redemption – Wisecrack Edition

What BoJack Horseman Teaches Us About Loneliness – Wisecrack Quick Take

What BoJack Horseman Teaches Us About Loneliness – Wisecrack Quick Take

Understanding Disney’s Star Wars Crisis – Wisecrack Edition

Understanding Disney’s Star Wars Crisis – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of VR – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of VR – Wisecrack Edition

How To BEAT the System (And Lose) – Wisecrack Edition

How To BEAT the System (And Lose) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Cowboy Bebop – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Cowboy Bebop – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of The Good Place – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of The Good Place – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Pokémon GO – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Pokémon GO – Wisecrack Edition

The Purge TV Series: Must-Know Philosophy Before You Watch – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Purge TV Series: Must-Know Philosophy Before You Watch – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Film Tourist: The Scene That Changes the Entire Meaning of The Shining

The Film Tourist: The Scene That Changes the Entire Meaning of The Shining

Why Fortnite Makes Billions – Wisecrack Edition

Why Fortnite Makes Billions – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Sacha Baron Cohen – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Sacha Baron Cohen – Wisecrack Edition

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace – What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace – What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Internet Was A Mistake

The Internet Was A Mistake

A Surreal Trip – The Philosophy of Atlanta – Wisecrack Edition

A Surreal Trip – The Philosophy of Atlanta – Wisecrack Edition

Violence & Metaphysics: The Philosophy of Devilman Crybaby – Wisecrack Edition

Violence & Metaphysics: The Philosophy of Devilman Crybaby – Wisecrack Edition

Would You Rather Be a RICK or a JERRY? – The Psychology of Rick and Morty – Wisecrack Edition

Would You Rather Be a RICK or a JERRY? – The Psychology of Rick and Morty – Wisecrack Edition

How Fahrenheit 451 Predicted Fake News – How Did We Get Here?

How Fahrenheit 451 Predicted Fake News – How Did We Get Here?

The Philosophy of Grant Morrison – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Grant Morrison – Wisecrack Edition

The Film Tourist: The Scene That Changes the Entire Meaning of The Wolf of Wall Street

The Film Tourist: The Scene That Changes the Entire Meaning of The Wolf of Wall Street

Why Thanos Changed – Wisecrack Edition

Why Thanos Changed – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Bo Burnham – Wisecrack Edition – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Bo Burnham – Wisecrack Edition – Wisecrack Edition

The Science and Philosophy of Psycho-Pass – Wisecrack Edition

The Science and Philosophy of Psycho-Pass – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Miyazaki – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Miyazaki – Wisecrack Edition

Incredibles 2: Why Screenslaver is RIGHT – Wisecrack Quick Take

Incredibles 2: Why Screenslaver is RIGHT – Wisecrack Quick Take

SOLO: When Easter-Eggs Go Wrong – Wisecrack Edition

SOLO: When Easter-Eggs Go Wrong – Wisecrack Edition

The Big Bang Theory: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Big Bang Theory: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Why Our Heroes Are Different Now (God of War, The Last Jedi, Logan) – Wisecrack Edition

Why Our Heroes Are Different Now (God of War, The Last Jedi, Logan) – Wisecrack Edition

Why Hopelessness Is Hilarious (Rick & Morty, Archer, Gary and his Demons) – Wisecrack Edition

Why Hopelessness Is Hilarious (Rick & Morty, Archer, Gary and his Demons) – Wisecrack Edition

Would THE PURGE Be Good for You? (The Science of Purging) — Wisecrack Edition

Would THE PURGE Be Good for You? (The Science of Purging) — Wisecrack Edition

Is DEADPOOL 2 a Two-Hour “LOGAN” Joke? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Is DEADPOOL 2 a Two-Hour “LOGAN” Joke? – Wisecrack Quick Take

How the Author of Watchmen Tried To End the Word – Wisecrack Edition

How the Author of Watchmen Tried To End the Word – Wisecrack Edition

The Cloverfield Paradox – What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Cloverfield Paradox – What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

How The Philosophy of Avengers: Infinity War Predicts Avengers 4 – Wisecrack Quick Take

How The Philosophy of Avengers: Infinity War Predicts Avengers 4 – Wisecrack Quick Take

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Watchmen vs. One Punch Man: How To Destroy A Hero (Satire vs. Parody) – Wisecrack Edition

Watchmen vs. One Punch Man: How To Destroy A Hero (Satire vs. Parody) – Wisecrack Edition

Are We All Just Hosts? – Unraveling Westworld Season 2 Episode 1 – Wisecrack Quick Take

Are We All Just Hosts? – Unraveling Westworld Season 2 Episode 1 – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Science of One Punch Man – Wisecrack Edition

The Science of One Punch Man – Wisecrack Edition

Metal Gear: How Kojima vs. Konami Shaped the Games – Wisecrack Edition

Metal Gear: How Kojima vs. Konami Shaped the Games – Wisecrack Edition

Bee Movie But It’s About Capitalism (Seriously.) – Wisecrack Edition

Bee Movie But It’s About Capitalism (Seriously.) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Deus Ex: Does Paranoia Have Its PURPOSE? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Deus Ex: Does Paranoia Have Its PURPOSE? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Assassin’s Creed Rogue Remastered – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Assassin’s Creed Rogue Remastered – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of NieR:Automata – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of NieR:Automata – Wisecrack Edition

Too Many Cooks vs. Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared: Decoding the Disturbing – Wisecrack Edition

Too Many Cooks vs. Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared: Decoding the Disturbing – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Neon Genesis Evangelion – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Neon Genesis Evangelion – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Jigsaw – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Jigsaw – Wisecrack Edition

Is Black Panther’s Killmonger the Best Villain Since the Joker? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Is Black Panther’s Killmonger the Best Villain Since the Joker? – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan (Part 3) feat. Interstellar & Dunkirk – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan (Part 3) feat. Interstellar & Dunkirk – Wisecrack Edition

How Monty Python Shaped Modern Comedy (feat. Rick and Morty & Deadpool) – Wisecrack Edition

How Monty Python Shaped Modern Comedy (feat. Rick and Morty & Deadpool) – Wisecrack Edition

The (Accidental) Philosophy of The Boss Baby – Wisecrack Edition

The (Accidental) Philosophy of The Boss Baby – Wisecrack Edition

The Political Philosophy of Captain America: Civil War – Wisecrack Edition

The Political Philosophy of Captain America: Civil War – Wisecrack Edition

Gaze Into the Abyss – Nihilism in Rick and Morty & BoJack Horseman – Wisecrack Edition

Gaze Into the Abyss – Nihilism in Rick and Morty & BoJack Horseman – Wisecrack Edition

Bright: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Bright: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Black Mirror: What’s the Point? – Wisecrack Quick

Black Mirror: What’s the Point? – Wisecrack Quick

The Philosphy of Wonder Woman – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosphy of Wonder Woman – Wisecrack Edition

Does Pixar’s Coco Change How We Look at Death? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Does Pixar’s Coco Change How We Look at Death? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Deadpool: How to Advertise in 2017 – Wisecrack Edition

Deadpool: How to Advertise in 2017 – Wisecrack Edition

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Themes Explained – Wisecrack Quick Take

Star Wars: The Last Jedi – Themes Explained – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Philosophy of Archer – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Archer – Wisecrack Edition

Man of Steel: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Man of Steel: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Fight Club – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Fight Club – Wisecrack Edition

South Park: Did 2017 BREAK The Show? – Wisecrack Quick Take

South Park: Did 2017 BREAK The Show? – Wisecrack Quick Take

How Adventure Time Tells A Story – Wisecrack Edition

How Adventure Time Tells A Story – Wisecrack Edition

The Lion King: Is Simba the VILLAIN? – Wisecrack Edition

The Lion King: Is Simba the VILLAIN? – Wisecrack Edition

My Hero Academia: Why Heroes Matter – Wisecrack Quick Take

My Hero Academia: Why Heroes Matter – Wisecrack Quick Take

How South Park Gets Trump Right – Wisecrack Quick Take

How South Park Gets Trump Right – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Emoji Movie: What Went Wrong?  – Wisecrack Edition

The Emoji Movie: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Thor: Ragnarok – The Smartest Marvel Movie Ever? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Thor: Ragnarok – The Smartest Marvel Movie Ever? – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Philosophy of Berserk (Anime)  – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Berserk (Anime) – Wisecrack Edition

Destiny 2 on Religion: Rise of Evil – Wisecrack Quick Take

Destiny 2 on Religion: Rise of Evil – Wisecrack Quick Take

Stranger Things: A Theory On Nostalgia – Wisecrack Edition

Stranger Things: A Theory On Nostalgia – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Saw – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Saw – Wisecrack Edition

BoJack Horseman Season 4: What is BoJack Searching For? – Wisecrack Quick Take

BoJack Horseman Season 4: What is BoJack Searching For? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Blade Runner 2049: Do Memories Make Us Human? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Blade Runner 2049: Do Memories Make Us Human? – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Philosophy of Mr. Robot – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Mr. Robot – Wisecrack Edition

Why Beth Chose Jerry – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 10 Breakdown

Why Beth Chose Jerry – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 10 Breakdown

How Social Media Ruined Nuance – South Park Season 21 Episode 3 Breakdown

How Social Media Ruined Nuance – South Park Season 21 Episode 3 Breakdown

Clone Beth vs. Pickle Rick: Does Choice Matter? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 9 Breakdown

Clone Beth vs. Pickle Rick: Does Choice Matter? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 9 Breakdown

Blade Runner: Must-Know Philosophy Before 2049 – Wisecrack Quick Take

Blade Runner: Must-Know Philosophy Before 2049 – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan (Part 2) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan (Part 2) – Wisecrack Edition

South Park – Season 20: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

South Park – Season 20: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

How Do We Escape the System?  – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 7 Breakdown

How Do We Escape the System? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 7 Breakdown

Netflix’s Death Note: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Netflix’s Death Note: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Why Does Rick Need Toxic Rick? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 6 Breakdown

Why Does Rick Need Toxic Rick? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 6 Breakdown

Can Game of Thrones Still Surprise Us? – Wisecrack Quick Take

Can Game of Thrones Still Surprise Us? – Wisecrack Quick Take

The Philosophy of Dragon Ball – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Dragon Ball – Wisecrack Edition

Finding Dory: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Finding Dory: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Death Note – Who Is Justice? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Death Note – Who Is Justice? – Wisecrack Edition

What’s The Point of Rick’s Game? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 4 Breakdown

What’s The Point of Rick’s Game? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 4 Breakdown

Rick and Morty: What is Rick Afraid of? – Season 3 Episode 3 Breakdown

Rick and Morty: What is Rick Afraid of? – Season 3 Episode 3 Breakdown

What Key & Peele Teach Us About Comedy – Wisecrack Edition

What Key & Peele Teach Us About Comedy – Wisecrack Edition

Rick and Morty: Is Modern Life Soul-Crushing? – Season 3 Episode 2 Breakdown

Rick and Morty: Is Modern Life Soul-Crushing? – Season 3 Episode 2 Breakdown

What South Park Teaches Us About Economics – Wisecrack Edition

What South Park Teaches Us About Economics – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan (Part 1) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Christopher Nolan (Part 1) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Daenerys Targaryen – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Daenerys Targaryen – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Black Mirror – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Black Mirror – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Spider-man – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Spider-man – Wisecrack Edition

Assassin’s Creed: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Assassin’s Creed: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Walking Dead: Why Do We Love the Zombie Apocalypse? – Wisecrack Edition

The Walking Dead: Why Do We Love the Zombie Apocalypse? – Wisecrack Edition

The Matrix Reloaded: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Matrix Reloaded: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Logan – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Logan – Wisecrack Edition

Batman v Superman: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Batman v Superman: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of One Punch Man – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of One Punch Man – Wisecrack Edition

How Rick & Morty Tells A Story (The Ricks Must Be Crazy) – Wisecrack Edition

How Rick & Morty Tells A Story (The Ricks Must Be Crazy) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Get Out – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Get Out – Wisecrack Edition

It’s Always Sunny: The Perfect Anti-Sitcom? – Wisecrack Edition

It’s Always Sunny: The Perfect Anti-Sitcom? – Wisecrack Edition

South Park: The Philosophy of Margaritaville – Wisecrack Edition

South Park: The Philosophy of Margaritaville – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Ghost in the Shell – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Ghost in the Shell – Wisecrack Edition

Rick and Morty: The Philosophy of Szechuan Sauce – Wisecrack Edition

Rick and Morty: The Philosophy of Szechuan Sauce – Wisecrack Edition

Westworld’s Must-Know Music References – Wisecrack Edition

Westworld’s Must-Know Music References – Wisecrack Edition

The Dark Knight Rises: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Dark Knight Rises: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Battlefield 1: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Battlefield 1: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Attack on Titan – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Attack on Titan – Wisecrack Edition

Suicide Squad: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

Suicide Squad: What Went Wrong? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Westworld – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Westworld – Wisecrack Edition

The Walking Dead: The Philosophy of Negan – Wisecrack Edition

The Walking Dead: The Philosophy of Negan – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Get Schwifty (Rick and Morty) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Get Schwifty (Rick and Morty) – Wisecrack Edition

South Park’s Must-Know References! – Wisecrack Edition

South Park’s Must-Know References! – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Fallout 4 – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Fallout 4 – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Darth Vader – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Darth Vader – Wisecrack Edition

Rick & Morty’s Must-Know References! – Wisecrack Edition

Rick & Morty’s Must-Know References! – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of The Purge (with Rick & Morty!) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of The Purge (with Rick & Morty!) – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of BoJack Horseman – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of BoJack Horseman – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Shia LaBeouf – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Shia LaBeouf – Wisecrack Edition

Mr. Robot: The Essential Cinematic Inspirations – Wisecrack Edition

Mr. Robot: The Essential Cinematic Inspirations – Wisecrack Edition

Is Zootopia RACIST!? – Wisecrack Edition

Is Zootopia RACIST!? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Kanye West – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Kanye West – Wisecrack Edition

South Park on RELIGION – Wisecrack Edition

South Park on RELIGION – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of The Joker – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of The Joker – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Star Trek – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Star Trek – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Marvel’s Daredevil – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Marvel’s Daredevil – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Bill Murray – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Bill Murray – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Deadpool – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of Deadpool – Wisecrack Edition

Game of Thrones: Get Ready to DIE! – Wisecrack Edition

Game of Thrones: Get Ready to DIE! – Wisecrack Edition

Are Video Games RUINING Gaming? – Wisecrack Edition

Are Video Games RUINING Gaming? – Wisecrack Edition

The Philosophy of South Park

The Philosophy of South Park

Inside Out: Is Joy the VILLAIN?

Inside Out: Is Joy the VILLAIN?

The Philosophy of Dark Souls

The Philosophy of Dark Souls

The Psychology of Final Fantasy (VI thru XIII)

The Psychology of Final Fantasy (VI thru XIII)

The Philosophy of House of Cards

The Philosophy of House of Cards

The Philosophy of The Walking Dead

The Philosophy of The Walking Dead

The Brilliant Deception of Inception

The Brilliant Deception of Inception

The Philosophy of Rick and Morty

The Philosophy of Rick and Morty

The Philosophy of Fallout

The Philosophy of Fallout

The Hidden Meaning of <br />Halo

The Hidden Meaning of
Halo

The Genius of <br />Michael Jackson’s Thriller

The Genius of
Michael Jackson’s Thriller

The Hidden Messages in GTA V (Grand Theft Auto V)

The Hidden Messages in GTA V (Grand Theft Auto V)

The Philosophy of Bioshock

The Philosophy of Bioshock